Woodturner's Resource
Woodturner's Resource  
  • Featured Artist    • Websites   Support Wr
Tutorials, Projects & Tips   • Event Calendar   • Tool and Book Store
  Home Page Forum HelpSearch Map TPT Resources LoginRegister
 
Page Index Toggle Pages: 1
Send Topic Print
end grain help (Read 1,157 times)
 
chris
WR Noob
Offline


I love YaBB 1G - SP1!

Posts: 3

end grain help
Aug 27th, 2005 at 1:37pm
 
Today I attempted my first ever end grain project.  A goblet.  I managed to complete it in one piece.  I was happy about that, but I have a lot of room for improvement.  I know practice, practice, practice.....I attend to.  I had a ton of fun making it, also a few scary moments.  Now the question, what is the proper (or best) tool for carving out the middle of end grain work?  Is it a bowl gouge, fingernail gouge, or scraper.  Or something else.  Any help would be great.
chris
Back to top
  
 
IP Logged
 
E. Bud Gillaspie
WR Addict
*****
Offline


Where'd I put that round
tuit?

Posts: 1,182

Gender: male
Re: end grain help
Reply #1 - Aug 27th, 2005 at 2:18pm
 
Chris, I don't necessarily do things the "correct" way; I use a spindle detail gouge & either a square-nose or round-nose scraper. I'm not tellin' ya that these are what you should use, I'm only tellin' ya what I use.

I'm sure our friendly, neighborhood, moderator and others will tell you what they use. Also, look at spinner's (Chris's) hollowing video(s).
Back to top
  

E. Bud Gillaspie Umpqua Turning Club
 
IP Logged
 
Rick in Lincoln
WR Addict
*****
Offline


keep on turnin'

Posts: 605

Gender: male
Re: end grain help
Reply #2 - Aug 27th, 2005 at 2:26pm
 
Chris for my goblets (all 2 of them), I'm with E.Bud.  Use a spindle gouge to get the majority of the bowl hollowed out (cutting from center out), then use either the gouge again or a scraper for the final cuts.  I have a half round scraper with the edge pulled back along the left side that does a pretty good job.  Gets the sides down to a little under an eighth.  You gonna post a pic?
Back to top
  

A cubicle is just a padded cell without a door.
 
IP Logged
 
Curt Fuller
WR Addict
*****
Offline



Posts: 736

Gender: male
Re: end grain help
Reply #3 - Aug 27th, 2005 at 2:39pm
 
Chris, one hint that I've learned. Start with a 3/8 drill bit. I measure how deep I want the hollow to be and mark the bit just a bit short with some masking tape. Because I don't have a jacobs chuck for my tail stock I  just grip it with a pair of vicegrips, line it up with the center, and drill a starter hole. I guess you could pre drill it in a drill press or with a hand drill before you mount it on the lathe too. Anyway, that gives you a starting point and a depth guide. Then I use a round or half round scraper and work from the center out. That way you're not actually fighting the end grain so much because you're turning against the inside mostly. After I get most of the wood hollowed out I use a bowl gouge to carefully make some shear cuts that leave it pretty smooth and don't require much sanding. But for me, the scrapers work as fast as a gouge with less chance of catches that can ruin what your making.
Back to top
  

Never miss a good chance to shut up.
 
IP Logged
 
Negeltu
Senior Member
****
Offline



Posts: 318

Gender: male
Re: end grain help
Reply #4 - Aug 27th, 2005 at 5:41pm
 
I mount a drill bit in the tailstock with a jacobs chuck usually.  Then I drill to the depth I wish and start removing the bulk of the material with a detail gouge with a finger nail grind.  After that...if the inside profile is not to my liking...I will take a round nose or a square end scraper to finish it up.  Be careful when presending those scrapers to the bottom.  Try not to present the full edge at once or you will get a very nasty catch.  I avoid that mostly by using the scrapers to take shearing cuts.  Leaves a much cleaner surface.
Back to top
« Last Edit: Aug 27th, 2005 at 5:42pm by Negeltu »  
Ezridaeus  
IP Logged
 
Philip Peak
WR Addict
*****
Offline



Posts: 3,431

Southeastern Indiana, Indiana, USA
Southeastern Indiana
Indiana
USA

Gender: male
Re: end grain help
Reply #5 - Aug 28th, 2005 at 12:52am
 
  There is a tool called a Termite tool made by Oneway (the same people who make the lathes and chucks).  It is specifically designed for cutting through endgrain.  Most people don't like the termite because it can be difficult to use and catches very easily if not used correctly.  Once learned it can, as it says, eat through endgrain, and leave a good surface to boot.  Like I said though it is tricky to use.   It was mentioned earlier to drill a hole to the depth you wish to hollow out, this is especially true with a termite tool as it is not very good at digging since most of it's cutting takes place on it side.
  Also Sorby tools makes one that is similar called a ring tip tool which I am sure works very similar to the termite but I have never used it. 
Back to top
  

The woodturner formerly known as PhilipE.  Willing to mentor members who live in the southeastern Indiana/Kentuckiana area (Louisville area)
WWW poet0928  
IP Logged
 
Ned A from South GA
WR Addict
*****
Offline


Formerly Nappen who said...Sleep
is for wimps

Posts: 1,584

Gender: male
Re: end grain help
Reply #6 - Aug 28th, 2005 at 3:32am
 
I am with everyone above. Drill to depth, hollow with a swept back gouge, finish with a half round or square nosed scraper, depending on the shape.

Raffan has a nice bit on endgrain hollowing in his projects video.
Back to top
  

I'm not addicted to coffee, it just keeps the headaches away.
 
IP Logged
 
Rev. Doug Miller
WR Addict
*****
Offline


Working flat so I can
support my addiction.

Posts: 9,601

Hardinsburg, KY, Kentucky, USA
Hardinsburg, KY
Kentucky
USA

Gender: male
Re: end grain help
Reply #7 - Aug 28th, 2005 at 7:35am
 
One of the things that we have to remember is that for smoothest cutting we need to go with the grain.  That means that for bowls turned crossgrain, grain running perpendicular to the bed ways, we hollow the inside from rim to center.  On the other hand, pieces that are being turned endgrain, grain running parrellel to the bed ways, when using a bowl gouge we need to cut from center toward the rim/side of the piece.  That's what we do when using hollowing tools as well.  If you're not, give it a try and see if I'm not speaking truth here.  DAMHIKT        8)
Back to top
  

Mentor, Hardinsburg, KY.  Basics, bowls, platters, hollow forms, pens.  Send PM for more information or make reservation

Ears Are The Most
Important Tools For
Communication
WWW cmdmiller Doug Miller  
IP Logged
 
Page Index Toggle Pages: 1
Send Topic Print