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Inlace question (Read 1,918 times)
 
Rick in Lincoln
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Inlace question
Oct 6th, 2005 at 9:31am
 
I got my first inlace kit a while back and have tried it on a piece of maple.  Pretty interesting stuff to work with.  Here's my question:  Should I have sealed the surrounding areas with sealer like you would with a CA fill?  I ask because here's what a portion of the filled crack looks like after I put the piece back on the lathe and knocked off the excess:

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Will the stained areas still take a finish?  I'd just go ahead and try, but I missed a couple spots and could do a fresh batch to fill them, but if the wood won't take a finish, I'll wait for the next time.
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Jeff Matter
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Re: Inlace question
Reply #1 - Oct 6th, 2005 at 3:33pm
 
Sorry I cant give ya a definate answer, but from my experience, things soak into wood leaving marks. Whether it be glue or water or whatever it soaks into the pores and inevitably will mark it (especially when staining) I would think if your using clear finish then a lite coat of shellac over the exposed areas (not the inside where the filler has to make contact) would prevent this.Mebee done with an artist brush?? That of course depends on the base of the filler. I would assume its not a denatured alcohol.
  I dunno how that would react with an oil finish tho.
for what its worth.....theres my $0.02

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Philip Peak
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Re: Inlace question
Reply #2 - Oct 6th, 2005 at 4:07pm
 
Rick
  It has been my experience with CA glue that if I use an oil finish (like watco Danish oil) or an oil and urethane finish then the staining is not visible, just make sure you do a good sanding.
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texascop47
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Re: Inlace question
Reply #3 - Oct 7th, 2005 at 12:08pm
 
Rick when I do Inlace I will finish turning the piece and let it sit for a couple of days to adjust.  Then I will sand it smooth and cut the grooves or design that is to hold the inlace.  I apply the inlace then let it dry overnight and sand back down.  Then I apply the finish.  I usually use Tung oil and buff with the beal system.  I havn't had a problem doing that.  Once in a while if I leave air bubbles some will chip out but I just put in some more inlace to this spot and resand.
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Rick in Lincoln
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Re: Inlace question
Reply #4 - Oct 7th, 2005 at 12:24pm
 
TC, this piece was dry, and I burned in the grooves for the inlace.  Since this was my first go-around with the stuff, I wasn't sure of my technique.  The instructions give 2 different numbers on the amount of hardener to use, so I kinda guessed on that.  I think the stain came from me putting in the inlace too early, before it had setup enough.  Later in the process, I didn't get this much wicking surrounding the inlace.  I only had what seemed like a few minutes when the inlace was the right consistency to work the piece, then it started to get rubbery and wouldn't stick to the wood at all.  Time was up.

Thanks for the tips.
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Curt Fuller
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Re: Inlace question
Reply #5 - Oct 7th, 2005 at 2:51pm
 
The few times I've used inlace I've found that it is pretty easy on a horizontal surface like the rim of a bowl. But when you try to use it in a verticle crack or cut it gets tricky getting it to stay. Like you said, before it begins to set up it just runs out and as it starts setting it gets rubbery and won't stick at all. They sell a filler at Woodcraft, it's called system 3, that comes in a quart plastic container and looks like small snow flakes. If you mix it into the inlace it becomes transparent but gives the inlace a thicker consistency so you can add the minimal hardener and have the benefit of slower set time along with a thicker consistency.
But as for the discoloring of the wood in your picture, I've never had that happen.
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Jimmy Cusic
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Re: Inlace question
Reply #6 - Oct 10th, 2005 at 10:05am
 
This may not be the "right way". I've used CA with the filler. I try to make the void "proud" with the filler material and then use CA to set it inplace.  Like fuller said horizontal is easier than vertical.  If it's a large void then some type of poly resign would be best. I use sandling sealer around the void fist so the CA won't bleed.  By the way I like the burning around your void. Looks nice.
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