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I - How to Control Chatter (Read 841 times)
 
DerekJeffries
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I - How to Control Chatter
Sep 20th, 2007 at 5:38am
 
Disclaimer:  This technique should only be attempted once you are completely comfortable with your Skew.


Quote:
I had LOTS of chatter problems when I was turning our Wizzard Wands.  See my gallery for pics.  Anyways, "my" method of handling it may be seen as "unsafe" to some.  So I'll give you a safe something to try first, and then you can decide for yourself if you want to try the WinsorWoods, er Raffan way.  

Basically chatter is caused by pressure from the tool bending the piece as it spins.  The pressure from the tailstock also factors into this.  

Safe way....Try this first:
Mount your blank in a chuck and steady with the tailstock.  Turn it round.  Back the tailstock off a tad and bridge the gap from the wood to the live center with several strips of masking tape.  Make a complete wrap of masking tape over these strips around the circumference of both the wood and live center.  Now use the adjustement wheel on the tailstock to PULL the tape taught.  You'll have to play with the amount of tension you use.   Now as your wood becomes thinner, your tailstock won't be pushing it causing it to bend.

Unsafe way:

Check out the Richard Raffan video called "Turning Projects"  In that video he turns the tiniest spindle using only the skew.  He supports the back of the spinning work with his off hand in such a manner that it balances out the pressure applied to the wood from the tool.  I use this technique regularly but PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE watch this video and decide for yourself if you are going to risk injury.  I feel confident that I can do it, but I know LOTS of others who cringe at the sight of it, right Yakimaw Turnings?

Dan


Quote:
You mean like this Dan?

That's my 1/4" round skew, the trick is to keep your fingers behind the cutting edge and take light cuts.

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Quote:
You got very good advices.
I would like to add:
Sharp tool, choose knot free straight grain dense strong wood such as maple.  Keep tool rest close. Turn as fast as you feel comfortable.  Don't force the cut.  If chatter already starts, cut back and start again from the not yet chattered section.  Once chatter starts, it keeps amplifying.
Work from the tail stock end towards the head stock; you may not be able to go back.
It is difficult to turn thin with spur drive and tail stock.  Thin spindle is likely to bend under the pressure from the tail stock.
If you use a chuck to hold the spindle and tail stock at the same time; make sure your lathe has good alignment.
If you don't want to use a chuck, you can cut the spindle a little longer; turn one end to fit the Morse Taper of your lathe.  Force the Morse Taper end of the spindle into your spindle.
Use steady rest.

Gordon


Quote:
Another trick that works for me is to turn the piece to final diameter, and even sand it if you need to, in about 1" sections at a time. That way you still have larger diameter wood supporting the section you're working on all the way to the final area. Kinda the same concept as when turning really thin bowls or vases.


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« Last Edit: Sep 20th, 2007 at 6:33am by DerekJeffries »  

Derek Jeffries
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