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I - Pricing Your Work (Read 6,264 times)
 
DerekJeffries
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I - Pricing Your Work
Oct 2nd, 2007 at 12:05pm
 

Bowls:

Quote:
... Width(") X Height(") X 4= $ That is using "inches" for the width and height numbers. You will then need too determine the add-on % for the commission, and total it all up for a retail price...


Rev. Doug Miller wrote on Nov 21st, 2005 at 5:20pm:
Another thought is to multiply diameter in inches X $10 + any premium for special wood or conditions.  A 7" open bowl made from unremarkable maple would be $70.  The same 7" bowl of maple burl might be $100 or more.  If it were a piece of historically significant wood, say from a barn owned by Geo. Washington, it might be $500 to the right buyer.  Finish will play a factor in any piece.  Segmented work really raises the price.  Once your name becomes a factor, pricing becomes more arbitrary.  

Your milage may vary.   8)


Frank Reed wrote on Feb 3rd, 2007 at 6:45pm:
...I can't get as philosophical as some, so I'll give you a rule of thumb that I use.  No bowl should sell for less than $35, and that would be in 4" to 6". Go up $10 to $20 for every additonal 2".  When you get to 12" to 14"  you need to be over $100 to $150.  We are talking about straight bowls, not segmented or textured.  If you can get these prices it should make for a good outing.


For more discussion take a look at these threads:


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Derek Jeffries
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Travis Northcutt
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Re: I - Pricing Your Work
Reply #1 - Oct 2nd, 2007 at 8:58pm
 
What about spindle work;  Pens, Game Calls, etc.... Undecided
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Artitst Formerly Known as BAMA &&Before you can thunder into Pharoah's court proclaiming "thus saith the Lord", you must first stand before a burning bush
 
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DerekJeffries
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Re: I - Pricing Your Work
Reply #2 - Oct 2nd, 2007 at 9:11pm
 
Smiley  As I find guidlines or formulas for pricing other items I will add them to the list... Smiley
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Derek Jeffries
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Re: I - Pricing Your Work
Reply #3 - Oct 5th, 2007 at 4:59pm
 
Bama,

Spindle work is a bit more arbitrary.  It really comes down to what your market will bear as with anything.  I can usually get a bit more for production items (pens, etc) and artistic pieces because of my selling area (Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, etc) but I usually have to discount functional items like salad bowls here because people see the ones at IKEA and such and don't understand it's not the same.  Back East, functional items sell extremely well but sometimes artistic pieces can be tough. 

I started by looking in local craft shops and galleries and comparing my quality to that of the items there.  Then I took those prices and based on that comarison set my prices accordingly.  If the person had made a name for themselves then I adjusted a bit more.
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duck_ditch_turner
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Re: I - Pricing Your Work
Reply #4 - Oct 7th, 2007 at 6:01pm
 
just got back from a craft show this weekend and have found out how to sell woodturnings
first  knowq how much you want for the item say a bowl that you price at 45.00 for it but do not put that price on it insted put a price of 145 on it and when they ask you if you can do any better look at the pice and act like you are in deep thought and then tell them that you could sell it to them for what you got in it say 45.00  they will buy it and think that got a bargin and you got what you wanted for it any way and everybodys is happy  if they pay the 145 then you made good
this is what i found out this weekend
also i had one person look at a pair of candel sticks that i had not priced but wanted 20.00 for the pair cause one was a little off center on the hole
and i told her to pay me what she wanted to and she had no idea what to offer me so i said that she could have them  she free  she still did not know what to say and keeped on asking me how much  after ten min of this i told free and walked away
that was my weekend with the public  not where did i put the burbonl
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Re: I - Pricing Your Work
Reply #5 - Oct 11th, 2007 at 1:49pm
 
I can't say that I ever haggle over pricing, it encourages the mentality that you'll give people a deal.  I don't.  I price it what it is, and don't discount it.  If it doesn't sell there, I have galleries that it will sell in.  Plain and simple.
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Michael Kuehl
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Re: I - Pricing Your Work
Reply #6 - Oct 11th, 2007 at 7:12pm
 
I agree with Hooligan.  Set a fair price, perhaps based on one of the formulas given above.  However,  what you can charge as a beginning artist of any kind is less than what a well-established artist can charge.  Keep a picture (if not the piece itself) along with the price for that piece.  Refer to that later, probably with chagrin, when pricing new pieces. Wink
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Re: I - Pricing Your Work
Reply #7 - Oct 18th, 2007 at 7:50pm
 
Man, can I relate to this!  I AM NOT A SALESMAN.  I have been a stay-home dad for 16 years, and I offered services & sold woodwork for way less than anyone would have, but I don't like dealing. 

I put a price, and I feel it's fair, but my trouble is, I'm flexible.  If I got a few bucks for something, I took what I could. 

For instance computer services.  I'm not an expert, but I know my stuff.  I have a small but loyal customer base, and my prices are VERY fair, but I enjoy it, and I get pleasure in helping people.  Lately I find myself charging $10.00 / hour for that work (computers), which is WAY below what the stores charge ,but I figured $10.00 / hour is better than a kick in the pants.   Grin  I will be less flexible in the future in my pricing.
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Re: I - Pricing Your Work
Reply #8 - Oct 19th, 2007 at 1:35pm
 
JDLanger wrote on Oct 11th, 2007 at 1:49pm:
I can't say that I ever haggle over pricing, it encourages the mentality that you'll give people a deal.  I don't.  I price it what it is, and don't discount it.  If it doesn't sell there, I have galleries that it will sell in.  Plain and simple.



I agree. I sell other things and I don't haggle...if you don't buy it, someone else will
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Re: I - Pricing Your Work
Reply #9 - Oct 28th, 2007 at 9:50pm
 
I am just back from first craft fair of the year and I had 2 other woodturners that I know stop by and tell me my pricing was too low. Using the formulas posted here I would have to agree that my prices are too low. In the future I will be raising prices to expected levels and see how they do!
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Re: I - Pricing Your Work
Reply #10 - Oct 29th, 2007 at 8:34am
 
Some may agree and some may not,BUT I have never changed my prices at any show because of what another crafter says.Because usually they are selling there crafts at a much higher price and want you to raise your price so that folks will buy from them.I always have my price set to what I need to make  before I even pack it up and if somebody tries to talk me down,I just tell them this is not a flea market.

PS I forgot to add,you will not get the price for you work at a craftshow that you may get at a gallery.For the most part,folks that go to craftshows are not looking to spend the big bucks as they would do at a gallery.
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« Last Edit: Oct 29th, 2007 at 8:40am by Ken Ward »  
 
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shawn394
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Re: I - Pricing Your Work
Reply #11 - Nov 3rd, 2007 at 11:37pm
 
Hi all

I am new to this forum, its seems to be a wealth of info.  If (or should I say when) I make the jump into something besides spindle work this site will be a great help to me.

I have been turning pens as a hobby for almost 2 years.  I am starting to accumulate enough that I am going to have to try to sell to people I don't know.  And you can only give away so many before you can't buy any more kits.  On one of the pen forums this topic comes up fairly regularly.  I am going to list the 2 most common responses for the question on what to price your pens at.

Approx 3 times cost of materials (blanks + kit)

2X plus $10.00 and always give my blanks a minimum of $5.00 value even if it was free

Another turner in the UK provided this response

Take the basic cost of all materials used (in this case kits + blanks). Add the cost of your labour on an hourly basis and then add the cost of running the shop on an hourly basis. This gives a $ amount to which 20% of that total is added to cover the cost of running the business (post-phone-petrol-show costs etc). This gives a $ total to which another 20% of this new total is added for business profit. This is your selling price.
This method was published in a craftsman magazine many years ago in the UK and It works for me. The only variables are your labour rate and your rate for running the shop.

Ed Davidson aka YoYoSpin has come up with a great excel sheet for pricing that can be seen here Multimedia File Viewing and Clickable Links are available for Registered Members only!!  You need to Login or Register

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Ric Rountree
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Re: I - Pricing Your Work
Reply #12 - Nov 4th, 2007 at 6:57pm
 
Would these methods apply to Holiday Ornaments as well, or does the season influence their pricing any?  l
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Re: I - Pricing Your Work
Reply #13 - Nov 7th, 2007 at 3:29pm
 
Ken Ward wrote on Oct 29th, 2007 at 8:34am:
PS I forgot to add,you will not get the price for you work at a craftshow that you may get at a gallery.For the most part,folks that go to craftshows are not looking to spend the big bucks as they would do at a gallery.

This is very true, and ( don't tell anyone) I adjust prices according to what I get in galleries, not at shows.  With the exception of few things, I charge the same as I would in a gallery.  I find, ,though, that as I sell more work, I have more people coming just for one of my pieces.

Ornament prices really vary.  I've not sold any this year, because everything I've been turning has been for friends/family.  I tend to set a price, close to what my shop time is, and go with it.  They'll sell.
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Re: I - Pricing Your Work
Reply #14 - Nov 7th, 2007 at 6:06pm
 
sorry i am straying away from the subject a little but i see a few mentions of having pieces sold in galleries. i have been told by my flat woodworker friends that i should submit my work to galleries, I was just wondering one if my work is really good enough for a gallery and secondly how do you approach a place like that to buy your work?
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