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lacquer runs (Read 979 times)
 
Tony Wheeler
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lacquer runs
Nov 8th, 2007 at 9:42pm
 
well I tryed for the first time to spray lacquer on a small bowl  yesterday and today i see that I have some runs.  what is the best grit paper to sand the runs out with and should I sand them wet or dry if wet what should I use a a liquid?  Also had a cartacte removed from my eye yesterday I guess that I should have listened and stayed in the house and I wouldn't have this question .
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duck_ditch_turner
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Re: lacquer runs
Reply #1 - Nov 9th, 2007 at 8:50am
 
a few question first
1 was the lathe runing
2 how much spray was used
when i use lacquer i have my lathe at 800 or 1000 rpm and only spray a little  at a time  after a couple of min rub down with tac cloth and respay
i do this 6 or 7 times then i rub down with pumice fine grit  wipe with tac and respray then rotten stone for last time   after that wax and buff with clean cloth  this works for me
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Rev. Doug Miller
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Re: lacquer runs
Reply #2 - Nov 9th, 2007 at 9:17am
 
Wheels, we talked a bit about this last night in the chat, but I wanted to answer your question a bit more here.  If it were my piece, I would, depending on how bad the run is, go back to 220 and wet sand with water.  If the run won't come out, you may have to go to a heavier grit to cut through it.  Part of the beauty of lacquer is that if you go through it, you can simply add more lacquer and the edges will melt in to the surrounding lacquer.  You should wet sand lacquer between each coat, I would suggest at least 400.  Once you are happy with the thickness of the lacquer, begin wet sanding again at the grit you've been working with and work your way up to as high as you can.  2000 is used in many industries to get a glass like finish.  If you go to this kind of trouble, I would suggest that you buff this finish off with the carnuba was only.
CoolRev. Doug Miller
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Tony Wheeler
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Re: lacquer runs
Reply #3 - Nov 9th, 2007 at 10:09am
 
thnks duck and rev it was off the lathe  I sand out the runs with 400 dry and then sand to 600 with water and I'm going to spray it again today now that I can see better  thanks again guys
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Re: lacquer runs
Reply #4 - Nov 9th, 2007 at 4:28pm
 
Most of my lacquer work is done on the guitars that I build. So, I'm not sure what to think about applying lacquer to a spinning piece on the lathe. My main objective while spraying lacquer is to get good flow and an even and level application. We may be comparing apples and oranges though. That being said, The only thing I can contribute is to use mineral spirits or Murphy's oil soap when you wet sand, not water. The reason here is that there is less chance of the grain raising if the water somehow gets under the top coat.
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