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Wood Smoking (Read 1,854 times)
 
JimQuarles
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Re: Wood Smoking
Reply #15 - Jan 24th, 2008 at 11:12pm
 
Do
NOT
do this inside your shop.  Fuming ammonia inside can can have fatal results.

JimQ
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Ron Sardo
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Re: Wood Smoking
Reply #16 - Jan 25th, 2008 at 9:43am
 
Leo Frilot wrote on Jan 24th, 2008 at 9:54pm:
Is there a list of woods high in tannins?  I'm hearing acacia and oak, but what are some others?  Sounds like it just might be time to experiment.



All woods have tannins, some more than others. I've played around with the iron/vinegar technique for ebonizing wood for a long time. Since this also relies on the tannin content of the wood, the results should be similar.  BTW, as Jim pointed out, and I only hinted at, ammonia can be dangerous. You need to work in a well ventilated area.  Iron/vinegar solution is allot safer.

One thing that I have noticed is wood from the same species can have vary from log to log the amount of tannin that is present in the wood. This is why oak is preferred, even with a differing amounts of tannin from log to log, there is so much tannin in oak that it doesnít really make a difference.

A wood that I use allot for ebonizing is black walnut, which is also high in tannin, but Iíve noticed at times when ebonizing, I would get a ugly gray color instead of a deep black This was always disappointing. Working on a totally unrelated building project one day, it dawned on me that coffee and tea are high in tannins. Later I decided to try and paint strong tea on to wood then apply the iron/vinegar. Boy, did that make a difference. I then played around with maple, holly, poplar and other woods with good results. But I noticed that at times on some wood I would have to apply two applications to get it black enough.

One thing I failed to mention, painting tea onto wood raises the grain, so I would paint a coat of tea, let dry, lightly sand away the whiskers then apply the iron/vinegar solution.

Now, the differences that I see using ammonia vs iron/vinegar is in the application. Sap wood is low in tannins and when fumed will not darken. Painting on tea and iron/vinegar, you need to cover the complete piece, otherwise you will get an unsightly edge that didnít turn black. 

For those who are unfamiliar with the iron/vinegar solution, here is the recipe. Take a glass jar with a good sealing lid, (I use a pickle jar). Throw in some steel wool (even rusty nails if you wish) and cover with white vinegar. Let sit for a few days and that is it. Iíve been using the same jar for years and every once in a while Iíll add either more vinegar or steel wool.

This idea for ebonizing wood is great for collars and finials. It is a great, inexpensive and green substitute for ebony.
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Leo Frilot
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Re: Wood Smoking
Reply #17 - Jan 25th, 2008 at 10:51am
 
Ron Sardo wrote on Jan 25th, 2008 at 9:43am:
†Sap wood is low in tannins and when fumed will not darken. Painting on tea and iron/vinegar, you need to cover the complete piece, otherwise you will get an unsightly edge that didnít turn black.

Unsightly?  This is the main reason why I want to try this technique.  I like the 2tone effect. 
Ron, ever try to get polka dots or patterns with your solution?  Is there a lot of bleeding into other areas? I gues it depends on the grain.
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Ron Sardo
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Re: Wood Smoking
Reply #18 - Jan 25th, 2008 at 11:26am
 
Leo Frilot wrote on Jan 25th, 2008 at 10:51am:
Ron Sardo wrote on Jan 25th, 2008 at 9:43am:
  Sap wood is low in tannins and when fumed will not darken. Painting on tea and iron/vinegar, you need to cover the complete piece, otherwise you will get an unsightly edge that didnít turn black.

Unsightly?  This is the main reason why I want to try this technique.  I like the 2tone effect. 
Ron, ever try to get polka dots or patterns with your solution?  Is there a lot of bleeding into other areas? I gues it depends on the grain.



Give it a try, maybe you would like it. I'd like to see the results if you do.
To me, it always reminds me of a kid using watercolor paints and the color drips down the paper. JMO
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