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Wax preparation (Read 1,046 times)
 
Stuart Reid
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Wax preparation
Mar 30th, 2008 at 3:40pm
 
I have watched several videos of guys using bees wax to finish projects.  The wax they use looks soft when it is applied and then rubbed in at speed to shine.  I bought some bees wax from Woodcraft and the bar is hard and doesn't look anything like the wax in the videos.  Are you supposed to melt the bar and add something?  How is that bar prepared so you can easily apply it to projects.  Thanks in advance.

Stu
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Rev. Doug Miller
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Re: Wax preparation
Reply #1 - Mar 30th, 2008 at 10:32pm
 
You can apply that stick bee's wax directly to the spinning piece.  Once you've applied it you then buff it off with a soft cloth or paper towel. 
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Stuart Reid
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Re: Wax preparation
Reply #2 - Mar 31st, 2008 at 9:45am
 
That is what I have been doing but it seems that little wax is transferred to the project, although it does shine and feel good.  Would the stick soften up if it was melted and re-hardened?

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Re: Wax preparation
Reply #3 - Mar 31st, 2008 at 11:26am
 
thin layers is what you want.  It will do you more good to apply more thin layers than to put one thick layer on.  When I was really young and very stupid I used Johnson's Paste Wax on a VW Beetle.  Good wax on a cheap car.  What I didn't know was that the wax needed to be put on SPARINGLY.  Instead I put enough wax on the car to do 3 or 4 cars.  Once the wax dried it took me 3 days to get it buffed off.  That exercise was probably the start of all my shoulder trouble that I've had over the years.  So the moral of the story is:  Thin is in - Thick will make you sick.
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Re: Wax preparation
Reply #4 - Mar 31st, 2008 at 11:30am
 
I also like to let the project cool before adding the next coat. That allows it to harden a little. I don't know if this is right or wrong but it seems like a built up finish is achieved easier. I should add this is on flat surfaces with an electric buffer.  Wink
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Re: Wax preparation
Reply #5 - Mar 31st, 2008 at 11:42am
 
Well it sounds like you all just use the hard bar the way it comes so that is what I will do.  The additional coats idea is also a good one and should also improve the finish.  Thanks again.

Stu
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Re: Wax preparation
Reply #6 - Mar 31st, 2008 at 6:10pm
 
Are you sure it is beeswax you have?  It sound more like a bar of carnauba, like Liberon's woodturner's wax stick.  The beeswax I use is actually a blend of beeswax and mineral oil and comes in a plastic jar in the form of a soft paste.  It is called Clapham's Salad Bowl Finish.

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It does not polish to a high shine but more of a soft sheen, and will need to be renewed periodically.

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Re: Wax preparation
Reply #7 - Mar 31st, 2008 at 11:21pm
 
I have a solid beeswax bar too.  I forget where I bought it, but it is similar to Carnuba except not as hard.  Out here it softens too much in the summer.

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Stuart Reid
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Re: Wax preparation
Reply #8 - Apr 1st, 2008 at 12:07am
 
I am sure it is Bees wax.  I also have the Carnauba Wax and the Tiburon Wax and they are both very hard as well.  The DVD I referred to is the one with Richard Raffan, "Turning Wood."  He uses a "chunk" of Bees wax on projects and it appears to be soft but maybe it is a visual defect.

Stu
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« Last Edit: Apr 1st, 2008 at 12:08am by Stuart Reid »  

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