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wax removal (Read 1,326 times)
 
Greg Plank
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Yankee Hill, California, USA
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wax removal
Jul 4th, 2008 at 11:52pm
 
Does anyone have any tips for removing wax from the front of a burl cap?
Thanks for any ideas.
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Leo Frilot
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Baton Rouge, LA, Louisiana, USA
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Re: wax removal
Reply #1 - Jul 5th, 2008 at 9:38am
 
Though not the best method, but I used a sandblaster on a piece of Red Mallee before.  I have heard of using a pressure washer with hot water (like at a car wash) or boiling the blank.  I have also heard of people using brake cleaner (automotive supply).

I am sure a floor stripper will remove it also.  Just unsure of the residual it will leave.

P.S.  I'm interested in hearing solutions also.  Great question! 

And welcome aboard.  Don't be a stranger; we all learn from each other's questions/comments.
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« Last Edit: Jul 5th, 2008 at 9:39am by Leo Frilot »  

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Rev. Doug Miller
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Re: wax removal
Reply #2 - Jul 5th, 2008 at 1:11pm
 
Mineral Spirits and a stiff brush.
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Leo Frilot
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Re: wax removal
Reply #3 - Jul 5th, 2008 at 1:49pm
 
I tried that Rev.  It didn't work for me but I guess it depends on the wax.  Undecided
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Rev. Doug Miller
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Hardinsburg, KY, Kentucky, USA
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Re: wax removal
Reply #4 - Jul 5th, 2008 at 4:44pm
 
Leo, you're probably right.  If it is Anchor Seal or a similar product, the mineral spirits should work.  If it is indeed wax, well then you can either use heat (wet or dry) or simply turn it off.  If you're trying to save the "bumps," your only option is heating it somehow.  The car wash is not a bad idea.
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nuturner
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Re: wax removal
Reply #5 - Jul 5th, 2008 at 4:55pm
 
If you prefer not to turn it off for some reason:
After using a scraper to remove all you can, then, being careful with the fumes and safety stuff like that,  try a rag with good saturation of ammonia (not the whole rag, just a corner or so) and see if that will soften it enough to wipe off.  I use ammonia regularly to remove past wax from floors.
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« Last Edit: Jul 5th, 2008 at 4:56pm by N/A »  
 
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Greg Plank
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Re: wax removal
Reply #6 - Jul 6th, 2008 at 1:03am
 
Thanks all. Maybe I'll try several things before I'm done. Will let you know if I find a miracle.  Undecided





























guess
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Chuck Beland
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Re: wax removal
Reply #7 - Jul 6th, 2008 at 6:20am
 
Rolumez,
Welcome to the WR family. Don't be a stranger jump in anytime & your Dad is very welcome also. We have some fantastic segment turners here.

Chuck
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Re: wax removal
Reply #8 - Jul 6th, 2008 at 6:38pm
 
Please don't use a solvent to remove the wax. A solvent will "carry" the wax particles into the wood possibly causing discoloration and finishing problems. I either scrape the wax w/a cabinstmaker's scraper or I turn it off on the lathe.

The same can be said for any process that melts the wax w/the exception of heated LDD/water drying solution. I'm told that the LDD will take the melted wax into solution. I have never tried this so I take it w/several grains of salt.

If you do use solvent then you must turn off all the discolored wood.
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John Nicholas
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Re: wax removal
Reply #9 - Jul 6th, 2008 at 9:29pm
 
Quote:
I use ammonia regularly to remove past wax from floors.


The floor finish you are calling wax requires a chemical reaction that involves ammonia to strip it off.  You can't use ammonia in many settings, schools, hospitals, nursing homes. You can buy a 'non-ammoniated' stripper.  Same chemical reaction.  If the ammonia softens the seal on your wood, it is probably not any wax commonly used by a woodturner.

I like the concept of scrapping what you can off, then heating.  I would think you could get the wax soft enough to wipe off, or perhaps finish washing off. 

If you are going to leave the original surface, is a small amount of wax going to change your intended finished appearance?

John Smiley
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Leo Frilot
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Re: wax removal
Reply #10 - Jul 6th, 2008 at 9:59pm
 
I'm not certain of the type or amount of wax on his burls, but I sure can sympathize.  I had the same problem, wanting to leave the spines on the burl but wanting the wax removed.  The pieces I had were so covered in wax that you couldn't hardly feel the spines.  Picking and wiping can be super tedious (DAMHIKT) and that's why I got on the sandblaster at work.  It did a fine job without destroying the spines.  This is the piece I was working on.  Notice the spines on the under side?
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E. Bud Gillaspie
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Re: wax removal
Reply #11 - Jul 6th, 2008 at 11:19pm
 
You're right, Leo, sandblasters are great. I've always wanted one but I've never had the cash to get one. HF has a sabdblasting, benchtop, cabinet (see above.)   Sad
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