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Bowl Saw (Read 689 times)
 
Rev. Doug Miller
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Hardinsburg, KY, Kentucky, USA
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Bowl Saw
Jun 5th, 2009 at 5:01pm
 
If you are like me, you tend to turn on a shoestring budget.  We spend what money we have carefully and after a bit of thought so that we don't waste any of those precious turning dollars.  I've mentioned it before, but now I have an example to show you what I've done with the Multimedia File Viewing and Clickable Links are available for Registered Members only!!  You need to Login or Register
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Richard Steussy has produced this coring tool with the mini lathe user in mind.  First off, the tool is inexpensive.  At $45 shipping included there is not another tool that will do what this tool does.  Second, the tool does what it says it will do.  My mini is 1/2 hp and had no stalling issues with this tool. 

I mounted my blank and turned the outside of my blank.  Once that step was completed, I reversed my blank and picked the place for the groove that the bowl saw needs to be able to cut under the inner core.  I used my Ci1, but a good parting tool could be used as well.  You don't want to be too stingy with this groove, but you don't want to use up too much of your core either.  You may have to play with it a bit to get a feel of how wide the groove needs to be.  The one thing to be careful of is to not go through the parent blank on the outside of the groove.  So watch that point carefully.

Once the groove is cut, the instructions say to turn the blank by hand while allowing the bowl saw to cut a starting groove into the core.  Not a bad idea with your harder woods.  On this cottonwood, I didn't feel like it was a necessary step.  Once the starter groove is cut, it is a matter of turning the lathe on at a slow speed and simply turning the saw blade into the wood.  It is not a hard job.  Nor does it require great grip strength.  You simply allow the saw blade to work into the wood.  In just a few minutes you have the core out of the blank ready to turn into a smaller version of the parent bowl. 

I can say that I've cored out 3 blanks with this tool and have yet to run into a catch or a grab of any kind.  If you turn on a mini and are tired of all that wood from the inside of your blanks going out on the compost pile, this is a tool that I whole heartedly recommend to you.  If you're turning on a lathe that has at least a 1 horse motor, 1.5 horse is even better, then one of the other coring systems might be for you.  However, at about 15% of what those coring systems cost, the Bowl Saw is a pretty handy tool to remove a small blank that can be turned into a bowl that could bring you nearly the cost of the tool.  How often can we say that? 

You can find the tool at Richard's site which is listed on the front page of this site.  Scroll down to the bottom and you'll find the Bowl Saw.  And to give you an extra sense of comfort, Richard is giving a "try it first" offer.  Hard to go wrong with a deal like that.
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« Last Edit: Jun 5th, 2009 at 5:52pm by Ron Sardo »  

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Vaughn McMillan
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Re: Bowl Saw
Reply #1 - Jun 5th, 2009 at 5:21pm
 
Thanks for the review, Doug. Can you post a bigger pic of the completed bowls? I'm just seeing the thumbnail-sized versions here.

From what I can see of the picture, it looks like you've overcome my primary consideration about the Bowl Saw. Due to the shape of the blade and the way it's used to cut the core, the resulting bowls can end up pretty flat-bottomed and straight-sided. I prefer a more curved form, but it looks like you left enough extra wood on both blanks to end up with a nicely curved final form.
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Rev. Doug Miller
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Working flat so I can
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Posts: 9,601

Hardinsburg, KY, Kentucky, USA
Hardinsburg, KY
Kentucky
USA

Gender: male
Re: Bowl Saw
Reply #2 - Jun 5th, 2009 at 5:22pm
 
Multimedia File Viewing and Clickable Links are available for Registered Members only!!  You need to Login or Register
CoolRev. Doug Miller
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Mentor, Hardinsburg, KY.  Basics, bowls, platters, hollow forms, pens.  Send PM for more information or make reservation

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Ron Sardo
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Re: Bowl Saw
Reply #3 - Jun 5th, 2009 at 5:52pm
 
Image Fixed
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Richard_R._Steussy
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Re: Bowl Saw
Reply #4 - Jun 6th, 2009 at 12:21pm
 
Thanks for the picture and great report on the BowlSaw.  I've just done a brand-new video on the tool which shows it in action. Check it out on my website.  xxxx 
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Steuss (bowlsaw.com)
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