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Danish Oil How to? (Read 1,098 times)
 
Bill Neff
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Danish Oil How to?
Jul 24th, 2010 at 10:52am
 
Ok I'm ready to try Danish oil finish for the first time and have a couple of questions.  I get the apply, wait, wipe off, repeat as necessary.  I've seen some instructions that say to use sandpaper with the oil wet to fill pores, etc (this was on flatwork).

What's your recommendation?

Thanks
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Al Wasser
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Re: Danish Oil How to?
Reply #1 - Jul 24th, 2010 at 2:17pm
 
Well, what kind of wood are you into??  You have the process down pat. Oak, Walnut or other woods with the larger pours is what you use sandpaper for.  You can also use the sandpaper, say 400 grit wet with the Danish oil for any wood.  In that case you finish sanding and wipe off the excess with a paper towel and let dry
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Bill Neff
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Re: Danish Oil How to?
Reply #2 - Jul 24th, 2010 at 2:49pm
 
Thanks Al.   The wood is Osage Orange.  It's been sanded to 400 grit and then I went over it with 0000 steel wool.  It doesn't seem to be an open pore wood like oak, so I wasn't sure if the sanding and making the slurry to help fill pores was needed.
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Re: Danish Oil How to?
Reply #3 - Jul 24th, 2010 at 2:58pm
 
Bill, steel wool is not good on bare wood.  It is too easy to catch a small sliver of metal and then have it rust under the finish.  It is OK on top of a finish.

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Re: Danish Oil How to?
Reply #4 - Jul 24th, 2010 at 5:31pm
 
Bill Neff wrote on Jul 24th, 2010 at 2:49pm:
Thanks Al.   The wood is Osage Orange.  It's been sanded to 400 grit and then I went over it with 0000 steel wool.  It doesn't seem to be an open pore wood like oak, so I wasn't sure if the sanding and making the slurry to help fill pores was needed.


Bill, every piece of OO that I had wasn't anything like oak.  I found it to be tight grain and polish almost mirror smooth.

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Re: Danish Oil How to?
Reply #5 - Jul 24th, 2010 at 9:22pm
 
For OO I would apply, wait, wipe, repeat.  I think you'll find that after about 5 or 6 coats that your finish will begin to be homogeneous and ready for the buffing wheel real soon.
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Bill Neff
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Re: Danish Oil How to?
Reply #6 - Jul 25th, 2010 at 9:00am
 
I got four coats on it last night.  It soaked up #1 and had very little wiping to do, each coat has had a little more to wipe off.

Great Rev.  Now I gotta buy a buffing setup?  Cheesy  I've used a buffing wheel in a drill.  But now I a real excuse.  "Why do I have buy this new tool?  Well the good Rev. Miller said to and he's connected just like our Pastor, so it's coming from above."  smiley=dankk2.gif
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Re: Danish Oil How to?
Reply #7 - Jul 25th, 2010 at 9:54am
 
Bill,  do you have a standard 3 jaw drill chuck that fits in your headstock?  If you do, go to the nearest Harbor Freight outlet and buy an arbor that is threaded one end and a 1/4 or 3/8 stub shaft on the other (fits in your chuck)  HF sells a package of three 8" buffing wheels for around 12.00.  Use the two "soft" wheels.  The arbor, wheels, and a stick of tripoli buffing compound shouldn't cost more than 20 - 25 dollars.  You can repeat this purchase for different buffing compound as you find need.  It isn't the Beal system, but it is cheap and get's the job done.  I know a whole bunch about being cheap.  Wink
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Re: Danish Oil How to?
Reply #8 - Jul 25th, 2010 at 8:40pm
 
Lad, read the instructions on the can and do exactly as written. I've never had a problem when following the instructions.

I also use 0000 steel wool on unfinished wood. If your initial prep. is good then you'll not get slivers.
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Re: Danish Oil How to?
Reply #9 - Jul 11th, 2018 at 11:02am
 
john Taylor wrote on Jul 25th, 2010 at 9:54am:
Bill,  do you have a standard 3 jaw drill chuck that fits in your headstock?  If you do, go to the nearest Harbor Freight outlet and buy an arbor that is threaded one end and a 1/4 or 3/8 stub shaft on the other (fits in your chuck)  HF sells a package of three 8" buffing wheels for around 12.00.  Use the two "soft" wheels.  The arbor, wheels, and a stick of tripoli buffing compound shouldn't cost more than 20 - 25 dollars.  You can repeat this purchase for different buffing compound as you find need.  It isn't the Beal system, but it is cheap and get's the job done.  I know a whole bunch about being cheap.  Wink 


I share John's preference for cheap.

I also purchased the three-buff Harbor Freight kit - a stitched cotton wheel for Tripoli, a plain muslin wheel for white diamond, and a plain flannel wheel for wax.  The set comes with washers for mounting them on an arbor.

But rather than using my Jacobs chuck, I made arbors for each wheel that screw directly onto my lathe spindle.  Each arbor is made from a scrap of 4/4 ash, drilled a 7/8" hole in face grain all the way through the wood, and then threaded the hole with a 1"x8tpi tap.  Soaked the threads in thin CA glue, ran the tap through again to clean up the threads.  Drilling and tapping face grain ash produces threads that are amazingly strong, and that will last a long if you apply a little paste wax on them to ease them onto the spindle.  My tap is a standard plug tap that won't thread all the way to the blind bottom of a hole, so I find that it works better to drill all the way through the wood, thread the full depth, face off the end to get to clean wood, and then glue on a second scrap of wood.  Finally, true up the composite arbor, and drill an on-axis hole to receive a bolt to attach the buffing wheel - I put the head of the bold inside the arbor, and the nut on the outside, but you could reverse that direction if you wish.


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