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Turning a small Acorn Box (Read 3,439 times)
 
Robert Gill
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Re: Turning a small Acorn Box
Reply #15 - Dec 22nd, 2010 at 6:36am
 
What gives with applying wax or whatever with the sandpaper.  That's the first time I have seen that.
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Rev. Doug Miller
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Re: Turning a small Acorn Box
Reply #16 - Dec 22nd, 2010 at 5:14pm
 
Lubricates the sandpaper and creates a slurry that is worked into any pores that the wood may have.  Pretty effective.  Quick and looks good, but really is a soft finish that will not last very long. 
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Ken Vaughan
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Re: Turning a small Acorn Box
Reply #17 - Dec 24th, 2010 at 10:58am
 
The hack saw (Starret Parting tool) is an ancient technique -  may be safer than the parting tool with a thin kerf and cuts the grain nicely. 

High tension frame and bimetalic blades make it pretty fool proof.  nice for matching grain.

wax sanding produces a wax swarf - but mineral spirits cleans things up well and allow a different finish later.  I use shellac wash coat over the mineral spirits cleaned surface.

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Ron Sardo
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Re: Turning a small Acorn Box
Reply #18 - Dec 24th, 2010 at 11:24am
 
With the hack saw, you need to have the teeth point towards the handle which is opposite of normal
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Donnie Kennedy
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Re: Turning a small Acorn Box
Reply #19 - Dec 24th, 2010 at 3:42pm
 
Lark Leazar wrote on Nov 23rd, 2010 at 6:50am:
Hacksaw on the moving wood, maybe it's just me but that's scary.  Roughing with the skew, then the roughing gouge shows up later - wow.


I use a skew for roughing more often than a roughing gouge... probably 99% of the time. When you get the hang of it you can go from a rough cut piece of split wood to a smooth as a baby's butt finish with the same tool and in less time.


I also part with a hacksaw and a coping saw with the blades turned around backwards... never had any issues or safety concerns with either.
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« Last Edit: Dec 24th, 2010 at 3:45pm by Donnie Kennedy »  

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Ron Sardo
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Re: Turning a small Acorn Box
Reply #20 - Dec 24th, 2010 at 4:10pm
 
Donnie Kennedy wrote on Dec 24th, 2010 at 3:42pm:
I use a skew for roughing more often than a roughing gouge... probably 99% of the time. When you get the hang of it you can go from a rough cut piece of split wood to a smooth as a baby's butt finish with the same tool and in less time.



Same here. I start with a peeling cut then planing cut.

I've also used the planing cut with the spindle roughing gouge.
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Donnie Kennedy
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Re: Turning a small Acorn Box
Reply #21 - Dec 24th, 2010 at 8:13pm
 
Ron... I was one of those guys who had a really bad first couple of experiences with the skew and avoided that thing for a while but then my hard headedness kicked in and I decided that I was going to make that (edited out) work for me.

With the exception of a couple of message boards and YouTube videos, I am self taught, so it took a while to get the hang of it, but it sure does pay off now.

I guess the game changer was just looking at it and thinking about how the skew works (as a cutting edge) and being able to anticipate how it will react to whatever position I put it in. Once you get to the point that you can feel the catch developing, you can make the necessary corrections on the fly to stop it from actually happening.

Because I know how it works, even after not touching the skew for nearly 2 years, I've pretty much picked up where I left off and it is still my go-to tool... I have has a few of the bone head catches during my re-introduction period, but I think I'm over that for the most part. I know it's still going to happen here and there, but that's just part of turning.
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Re: Turning a small Acorn Box
Reply #22 - Dec 26th, 2010 at 10:16am
 
A skew is my most often used tool, my thin, small skew is the one of four that is most likely to give me a catch. It is fantastic for detail work, but responds instantly to the tiniest change in position or angle. Let down your guard even a little bit and its evil side surfaces with a deep most inappropriate spiral.

Brad
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