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Robin Hood's Bowl (Read 1,453 times)
 
Richard Perry
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Robin Hood's Bowl
Dec 2nd, 2010 at 7:58am
 
Just saw this video and wanted to share.

Apologies if it's been posted before. Whatever lathe you have, you'll appreciate it more after watching.

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Dale Bonertz
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Re: Robin Hood's Bowl
Reply #1 - Dec 2nd, 2010 at 8:45am
 
I have always admired what the does but I do ask myself why at times. Maybe he is using it to stay in shape. Smiley I was a little disappointed that he used a tape measure since back then (mediaval times) they did not have them (I don't think). Cool video and his treddle lathe is pretty neat.

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Rev. Doug Miller
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Re: Robin Hood's Bowl
Reply #2 - Dec 3rd, 2010 at 11:12am
 
they may not have had a Stanley tape measure, but they surely had some type of measuring instruments larger than dividers and calipers. Not sure when the "inch" was developed, but it is VERY old.

From Wikipedia, "An Anglo-Saxon unit of length was the barleycorn. After 1066, 1 inch was equal to 3 barleycorn, which continued to be its legal definition for several centuries, with the barleycorn being the base unit.[2] One of the earliest such definitions is that of 1324, where the legal definition of the inch was set out in a statute of Edward II of England, defining it as "three grains of barley, dry and round, placed end to end, lengthwise".
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« Last Edit: Dec 3rd, 2010 at 11:13am by Rev. Doug Miller »  

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Dale Bonertz
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Re: Robin Hood's Bowl
Reply #3 - Dec 3rd, 2010 at 4:49pm
 
TMI  TMI   Grin Grin
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Ralph Lindberg
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Re: Robin Hood's Bowl
Reply #4 - Dec 3rd, 2010 at 9:33pm
 
Dale
Robin's lathe is not a treadle, but rather a spring-pole lathe. A treadle has continuous rotation, just like your power lathe. A spring-pole has goes back and forth, so you have to cut with an "interrupted" cut, that is only when the object is turning one way, and not the other.

I own a treadle, trust me, a treadle is easier for us "turners" then a spring-pole.

One of Robin Wood's most impressive bits, is the race between him and a guy on a Polewood, which Robin wins
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Making sawdust mostly, sometimes I get something else, but that's more accident then design.
 
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Dale Bonertz
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Re: Robin Hood's Bowl
Reply #5 - Dec 4th, 2010 at 8:38am
 
Ralph,
Thanks for clearing that up.  I always thought they were the same.  I have seen the video that you posted which first made me admire Robin.  He is pretty awesome with the old ways.

Dale
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Robert Harper
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Re: Robin Hood's Bowl
Reply #6 - Dec 4th, 2010 at 10:11am
 
I've recently thought of doing something like Robin's work at a local working farm where they have modest displays of old farm life. There is a blacksmith shop that does demos. I thought it would be fun to add a similar lathe and turn some of the downed timber from the woods on the property.

Just a thought and just for yucks mind you. Too many fun things to do and too little time.
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