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new shop (Read 1,178 times)
 
Andrew Sobota
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new shop
Jan 25th, 2011 at 10:04pm
 
Ok...so I'm about to get the "new" shop dialed in.  Arranged around Alice being front and center, all 7 ft and 1000 lbs of her.  I picked up an entire set of beautiful oak kitchen cabinets (with nice hinges and walnut inlays no less) on craigslist.  I have the shop wired for 220V and 110V.  The 4 gang 110s are on two circuits each GFI protected, and two 220V circuits, one dedicated solely to Alice with a split 220/110 ceiling receptacle for the lathe and the Sanders' light setup so I can have 360 degree access to Alice.  Tonight, I changed the plugs on the table saw and band saw for 220V as well.  The difference was spooky.  I'll have maybe 10-12' ft of base cabinetry, and another 8ft or so of tops.  A large 4x4 window will give light to the bench.  Glue-up jobs for flatwork will be done on a makeshift top for the tablesaw when need be.  I have four triple bank fluorescents (T5 bulbs), and a pair of cans, so I'm well lit after hours.  The base cabinets are cut out for a sink, but I think I'll replace the countertops and go sinkless.  I could do it, but have a sink one room over, and plan on doing all my finish work in another room entirely anyway.  I will ultimately build a full wall mount tool cabinet 6" deep and big enough to handle any length gouge I can't seem to live without, I'm thikning about sliding clear doors.  I should have plenty of room to organize the multitude of chucks, faceplates, sandpaper, and other tidbits that currently sit around and get in the way.  I can get the ancillary power tools put way, like the palm sanders, dill bits, etc.  The nicer chisels and pull saws will live in the oak machinists chest.  Roughed out bowls will be stored elsewhere to free up as much floor space as I can.  I'd love to get the tablesaw out, but have no other home, and it isn't exactly mobile, even with the mobile base.  The dust collector will continue to be a pain until I plumb it over to the lathe and give it a dedicated footprint.  The jointer will live in the finishing room as that room is huge and I can roll it to the shop when needed...I hardly use it.  Ok...so here's the question.  I am limited on space due to how the basement was set up.  The shop is maybe 12 x 18 or thereabouts with a full sized walkout door.  Not huge, but will get me by.  Its currently a mess, but I will pick up the cabinets Friday evening and hopefully hang em all this weekend.  That part will be interesting as I have to tapcon them into the basement wall.

So many of you have already done this and have decades of experience laying this stuff out, and I am wondering what you wish you'd have done, or what your were glad to have done??  Any help to make it work is appreciated.  Pics will of course follow.  Thanks.
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Rev. Doug Miller
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Hardinsburg, KY, Kentucky, USA
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Re: new shop
Reply #1 - Jan 25th, 2011 at 10:55pm
 
Double, triple, even quadruple the number of plugs you have and make sure you have them high enough to be over the base cabinets.  You may also want a few in the ceiling over the various benches and tools you my have. 

Another idea would be to mount some 2x furring strips to your walls and then put up 1/2" plywood.  Yes, you'll loose a few inches of floor, but the benefit of being able to hang things anywhere you feel like hanging it will out weigh those 4" in both directions. 

Sounds like you have it coming along nicely.  I'll be in the same boat in just a few weeks since my parsonage was sold with the old church building.  Found the house, just have to pack, move, and set up the new shop.
CoolRev. Doug Miller
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Guy Bratt
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Re: new shop
Reply #2 - Jan 26th, 2011 at 12:51am
 
  Andrew  you did make the correct changes in the motor wiring along with changing the cord caps/plugs?  I hate to here about smoke leaking out.
  My plans are for overhead air and vacumn lines along with the DC system.  I really dis;ike cords and hoses on the floor.

   Guy
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Ian Clark
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Re: new shop
Reply #3 - Jan 26th, 2011 at 5:52pm
 
I like the Rev's idea to sheet a wall rather than tap-con the accessories.  It gives you options. Just take care of any moisture & insulation considerations/repairs first. 

X2 on running lot's of circuits.  I prefer to run them surface mounted in conduit so that any future juggling acts or additions are feasable.

Happy planning!
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Andrew Sobota
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Have chainsaw, Will travel!

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1 hr south of Rochester, MN, Minnesota, USA
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Re: new shop
Reply #4 - Jan 26th, 2011 at 6:16pm
 
I did in fact make the wiring changes internally.  Jet was nice enough to include the extra wire nut in both machines.  It was quite easy.  I didn't even hurt myself, nor did I wear my helmet.  Legs 1 and 4 were to be wired hot and legs 2 and 3 were wired together.  The legs were even labeled in the machines with little stickers.  The difference in power was immediately noticeable.  I might re-wire the jointer tonight, but its not pressing.  I'm more likely to get the one last wall tidied up a bit and just box everything I can and move it to another room to make this an easy install.  I can wheel out nearly everything else, cept of course the white elephant.

I was thinking of hanging a few furring strips on the wall to hang the cabinets on.  Maybe now I'll buy some 3/4" plywood to hang the cabinets on like I did in the utility room to hang the electrical panel on when I put up the joint.  The basement walls are ICF, which are nice and cozy and dry, but a pain in just about every other way. 

In the various forms of circuitry, I have one those a 4 gang 110 boxes every 6 ft, and a 220 outlet about every 8 to ten feet.  With its small size, no matter where I put a machine, I'm within about 5 or 6 ft of an outlet.  I did move one up about 30" to above countertop height as it'd have been behind a drawer in one of the cabinets.  Ouch.  I fixed that immediately - er...it took about an hour by the time I was done melting foam channels etc.  The lathe will not be moving without the help of the football team, so its dedicated line ought to be fine.  I'd love to have all of it in a shop outside, but that just isn't gonna happen.

I'll put up a gantry when I find a piece of wood large enough to need it.  Or just use an engine hoist. 
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Vaughn McMillan
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Re: new shop
Reply #5 - Jan 27th, 2011 at 12:55am
 
Andrew Sobota wrote on Jan 26th, 2011 at 6:16pm:
...Maybe now I'll buy some 3/4" plywood to hang the cabinets on like I did in the utility room to hang the electrical panel on when I put up the joint...


I know several guys who've used OSB for their shop walls. Same idea as the ply, just less expensive. Most of them just painted the OSB with a couple coats of bright white Kilz primer and called it done. They all appreciate being able to mount just about anything just about anywhere on their walls.
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Rev. Doug Miller
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Hardinsburg, KY, Kentucky, USA
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Re: new shop
Reply #6 - Jan 28th, 2011 at 12:06am
 
OSB will work nicely.  I just hate cutting it and all the little splinters that fly everywhere.  Seems like every time I deal with the stuff I get a sliver under one of my finger nails too.  Not a happy moment for me.
CoolRev. Doug Miller
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