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Segmented Turning (Read 1,635 times)
 
Terry Triplett
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Segmented Turning
Dec 31st, 2012 at 10:43pm
 
1st let me say Happy New Year to all.

I am looking into getting into the mad world of segmented turning and have a few questions.

1. Can wood and acrylics be glued together safely? I want to put contrasting colors of acrylics between the segments and the individual layers.

2. Can someone tell me if there are any plans out there for jigs to use with a miter saw? I have seen many for table saws but I don't own one yet (its next on the list of power tools to get).

3. I am looking at the table saw that Home Depot has, does anyone have any thoughts on this saw?

Any guidance in the area of segmented turning would be appreciated.

THANKS.
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Tim Crews
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Re: Segmented Turning
Reply #1 - Jan 1st, 2013 at 12:20am
 
Terry, I don't know how good of a cut you can get with the miter saw, but with a table saw, you can do so much more. Cast iron table tops on a saw is a must for the added weight it provides. More weight more stability. I'm looking at upgrading my 70's model Craftsman with an older Delta Unisaw. Those old ones just cut so much better. I use an Incra miter 1000HD for all my angle cuts on a sled. a 60 tooth carbide blade makes for a smooth cut. Just a little stuff to think about. Craigslist usually will have some older table saws for a good price, so keep a check on it. Good luck and read everything and watch all the Youtube videos you can. Tim
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Ron Sardo
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Re: Segmented Turning
Reply #2 - Jan 1st, 2013 at 8:35am
 
Terry Triplett wrote on Dec 31st, 2012 at 10:43pm:
1. Can wood and acrylics be glued together safely? I want to put contrasting colors of acrylics between the segments and the individual layers.

It depends on the glue used. I've glued wood and metal, and wood and alabaster together with epoxy with success.

Terry Triplett wrote on Dec 31st, 2012 at 10:43pm:
2. Can someone tell me if there are any plans out there for jigs to use with a miter saw?

Malcolm Tibbets has one in his book which I use. Multimedia File Viewing and Clickable Links are available for Registered Members only!!  You need to Login or Register

I use a 100 tooth blade on my miter saw and a Thin Kerf 80 tooth blade on my table saw. No reason you couldn't do an excellent job with 60 tooth blades.
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steve rost
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Re: Segmented Turning
Reply #3 - Jan 1st, 2013 at 8:53am
 
Terry-  Happy New Year to you also.  I have been doing serious segmentation turning for a little over a year.  So I am still new to it.  I have been doing flat work for over 40 years and the concept of cutting segments is easy for me.  I briefly explored acrylics/corian/wood combinations in the internet.  I didn't find anyone that claimed they had good luck.  I wanted, as you, the vivid contrast plastics would give to a piece.  I think it could be done, haven't tried it, with a thick super glue, or two part epoxy.  Locktite is using a rubberized super glue to improve shock resistance, I have used it some with good results.   #2 I have made jigs for my table saw, miter saw and bandsaw for segmented turning and am successful with each.  I have a Ridgid table saw and use a premium blade with stabilizers.  The year I bought it it was a consumer "best buy".  Get the best you can afford.  I have a Ridgid miter saw. Google Malcomb Tibbitts.   Malcomb Tibbitts uses a miter saw, (get his instructional book or CD, its worth it.)  Much more difficult to attach jigs to it without drilling mounting screws. More blade runout with a miter saw, again use a premium blade.  Cruze the web for plans, and this site in the tips section. + 1 what Tim said You Tube is a good resource.
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Don Davis
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Re: Segmented Turning
Reply #4 - Jan 1st, 2013 at 8:55am
 
Terry, you did not specify which saw you were looking at, but they carry the Rigid 4512 and from my experience it is a really good saw. I researched quite a few before I bought and my own opinion is that it was the best value.
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Robert Harper
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Re: Segmented Turning
Reply #5 - Jan 1st, 2013 at 8:57am
 
I've tried the acrylic to wood with epoxy with not so good success. I even went so far as to rough up the acrylic with 80 grit, then wipe with a little acetone but it doesn't hold well. All it could do is a weak mechanical bond. There are two part glues that will etch the acrylic and make a chemical bond. I have some in a two part tube that uses a special gun to mix and dispense. I can't remember the name and brand right now. PM me if you want me to track it down.

As for the jigs, you can always make your own. Making your own tools is another of the fun things that draws us deeper into the vortex.

As for  table saws, I look at it like any other tool, buy the best you can afford and the largest that will fit in the space available. It is far easier to under use a tool than over use one. I've never really wished I had less tool but I remember many times that I wish I had much more.

The big key to segmented turning is getting the joints tight. Once you get that set, the rest is easy.
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Guy Bratt
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Re: Segmented Turning
Reply #6 - Jan 1st, 2013 at 9:10am
 
I use a miter saw.  One tip I would offer is not to depend on the saws angle gauge.  Instead make an accurate template and set the blade from that and use the saws clamp feature to hold that angle.
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Ron Sardo
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Re: Segmented Turning
Reply #7 - Jan 1st, 2013 at 10:31am
 
Guy Bratt wrote on Jan 1st, 2013 at 9:10am:
One tip I would offer is not to depend on the saws angle gauge.

Agreed

I use this Multimedia File Viewing and Clickable Links are available for Registered Members only!!  You need to Login or Register

and one similar to this Multimedia File Viewing and Clickable Links are available for Registered Members only!!  You need to Login or Register
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Ed Weber
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Re: Segmented Turning
Reply #8 - Jan 1st, 2013 at 10:46am
 
All good advice so far.
One thing about jigs is you will be making them forever. There is always a situation where you need to hold something in a different way than before.
Wood and Acrylics, really not a good match, wood moves much more than acrylics which usually results in joint failure. It can be done, but usually on a small scale.
I would also check out the AAW segmented turners site.
Multimedia File Viewing and Clickable Links are available for Registered Members only!!  You need to Login or Register
The previously mentioned Malcolm Tibbets is a founder and frequent contributor to the site. I found it a good place to join , especially if you are just starting out.
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steve rost
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Re: Segmented Turning
Reply #9 - Jan 1st, 2013 at 10:54am
 
Once I get my jigs tuned in with test rings I lock them down so they dont move.  I have a jig for every angle I commonly use.  Unless you have gremlins I can come back and get a perfect ring every time.  The grimlins now like to hide my tape measures and rules, they haven't found my jigs yet!  When I grow up I will go digital like Ron suggests.
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Jon McElwain
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Re: Segmented Turning
Reply #10 - Jan 8th, 2013 at 10:15pm
 
+1 for Malcolm Tibbitts book, "The Art of Segmented Woodturning."  I don't think it would be a stretch at all to say he is the master of segmented woodturning.  He "tells all" so to say in his book.  He did not cover the use of acrylic glued in as segments, but he does talk at length about wood movement.

As to the Home Depot table saw - I would again recommend Malcolms book.  You may decide to go with a miter saw for most of your cuts instead. 

You might consider a large (12" plus) disk sander for getting those perfect joints.  A miter saw and a disk sander will go a long way in a segmenting pursuit.
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Mike Fisher
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Re: Segmented Turning
Reply #11 - Jan 8th, 2013 at 11:07pm
 
While I do not have personal experience with acrylics, one of the club member does.  He has had success with using 5 min epoxy to bond/glue the acrylics to the wood. .
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Walt
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Re: Segmented Turning
Reply #12 - Jan 9th, 2013 at 9:43am
 
Segmenting is all about accuracy, attention to fine detail and a great deal of patience!  If you slop things together it will show.  I would recommmend for starting to glue segment pairs together, when dried glue those to each other and continue until you have half rings.  True up the half ring and then glue tose together.  Get Malcoms book as Ron recomended and even his first video.  Tight Bond glue is great for wood bowl and such, epoxy for other materials.  Here's a site that I learned allot from when I started segmenting Multimedia File Viewing and Clickable Links are available for Registered Members only!!  You need to Login or Register
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