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Lidquid Glass... (Read 2,913 times)
John Grace
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Lidquid Glass...
Mar 23rd, 2015 at 11:06am
 
Like many of you, I've used CA or epoxy glues to seal cracks or other imperfections in blanks.  My wife recently used the product called 'Liquid Glass' and I was intrigued by the viscosity of the material.  When using epoxy I've experienced problem getting the material deep into cracks where I think the thinner viscosity of the Liquid Glass would allow the material to seep deeper into cracks.  Has anyone used this material and what are you experiences?  Any thoughts would be appreciated, thanks.
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Dave Gill
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Re: Lidquid Glass...
Reply #1 - Mar 23rd, 2015 at 1:10pm
 
I have not heard of "Liquid Glass" - know where to get it?

I usually use Epoxy with a little less Part B (Hardener) and force it down into the crack with a Popsicle Stick or tongue depressor (depending on the size of the crack). Less Part B gives a little more working time but then let it set overnight to make sure it has cured before working. If you are going to color the epoxy, mix it with the Part A before adding the Part B - again, gives you more working time.

Let us know about the "Liquid Glass" and where it can be found.

Thanks - Dave 
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John Grace
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Re: Lidquid Glass...
Reply #2 - Mar 23rd, 2015 at 4:54pm
 
My wife found it both at our local Ace hdwe and I also know Home Depot carries it.  When I tried it, it had the viscosity of a 'heavy bodied' latex paint if that makes sense.  anyways, I tried it yesterday and am going to put the piece back on the lathe later this week to see what happens and will let you know.
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Alan Hollar
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Re: Lidquid Glass...
Reply #3 - Mar 24th, 2015 at 7:59am
 
This may be the product. A bar top epoxy finish, link here:
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Richard Pyle
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Re: Lidquid Glass...
Reply #4 - Apr 13th, 2015 at 1:20pm
 
I've considered doing that w/ our vacuum sealer we use in the kitchen. Wondering if it would work for stabilizing wood?
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David Hill
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Re: Lidquid Glass...
Reply #5 - Apr 16th, 2015 at 12:32pm
 
Basically it's what I use as my epoxy for cracks and voids-mixed with whatever mineral I want to use as color.  I like it because it starts out thin when first mixed so it can penetrate into cracks and if I want it thicker, I just let it set for a time then use it (depending on conditions--up to 45-60 min.).  It cures well and you're able to lathe or sand it without difficulty.  A plus is that if you need a little more fill, it sticks well to the prior application.  Only down side is that it takes about 24 hours to really set/cure well.
I've not had any issues with separation/moving and actually have had more bad outcomes with CA.
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« Last Edit: Apr 16th, 2015 at 12:33pm by David Hill »  

Everyday liberating nice things from ordinary chunks of wood---and I like gnarly wood, the outcome is nearly always better than the start.
 
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Ken Vaughan
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Re: Lidquid Glass...
Reply #6 - Apr 17th, 2015 at 12:25pm
 
Richard Pyle wrote on Apr 13th, 2015 at 1:20pm:
I've considered doing that w/ our vacuum sealer we use in the kitchen. Wondering if it would work for stabilizing wood?


Not enough vacuum to work effectively with penetration (28 inches Hg desired).  I have been looking for the perfect opportunity to use a bit of cactus juice on a punky endgrain bowl blank - let it soak in -- and then heat to 180 degrees F to set it.   Then turn away the material to final finish.   I am expecting some discoloration is likely.

Could/should work for thin sections or shallow penetration in select situations though.
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« Last Edit: Apr 17th, 2015 at 12:26pm by Ken Vaughan »  
 
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Willie Sims
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Re: Lidquid Glass...
Reply #7 - Apr 24th, 2015 at 12:11am
 
I think I know of the material your talking about, be very careful turning, it's brittle.
My dad worked in a fiberglass pipe company for close to 20 years, and I've used different epoxies in model airplanes
The issue with using thinner epoxies is that they are easier to crack.
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Ray Stubbs
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Re: Lidquid Glass...
Reply #8 - Sep 16th, 2015 at 2:45pm
 
Does anyone know if this material/Liquid Glass can be used as a finish like wop?
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Glenn Jacobs
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Re: Lidquid Glass...
Reply #9 - Sep 17th, 2015 at 12:24pm
 
Ray, you could use it as a finish. Apply very thin and be prepared to do a LOT of sanding to get rid of the runs as it is a SLOW cure-24 hours. I tried it and not again.  I will say it is not as sensitive to moisture as Alumilite.

Glenn J.
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Ken Vaughan
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Re: Lidquid Glass...
Reply #10 - Sep 17th, 2015 at 1:42pm
 

I remembered reading about thin epoxy and one of the turning clubs on the east coast has an article posted that is applicable --

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under tips and techniques  "Using Thin Epoxy"   

(This is Donna Banfield's home club -- she does some nice work)

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Ray Stubbs
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Re: Lidquid Glass...
Reply #11 - Sep 21st, 2015 at 6:31pm
 
Thanks Glen, I'll take your advice and not try it.
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David Schuelke
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Re: Lidquid Glass...
Reply #12 - Oct 23rd, 2015 at 12:21pm
 
Are you using the epoxy to fill cracks on turned bowls prior to sanding or blanks that have not been put on the lathe yet?
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