Woodturner's Resource
Woodturner's Resource  
  Featured Artist    Websites   Support Wr
Tutorials, Projects & Tips   Event Calendar   Tool and Book Store
  Home Page Forum HelpSearch Map TPT Resources LoginRegister
 
Page Index Toggle Pages: 1
Send Topic Print
Drying Bowls and Shrink Wrap (Read 903 times)
 
Tracy Tame
Junior Member
*
Offline


HELP! I'm being Sucked
into the Vortex

Posts: 37

Shoreline, WA, Washington, USA
Shoreline, WA
Washington
USA

Gender: male
Drying Bowls and Shrink Wrap
Nov 17th, 2015 at 1:07pm
 
I have rough turned a number of bowls in the 12 to 18 diameter and 1-1/4 to 1-3/4 thickness range of Sweet Gum and Elm. They have been coated inside and out with Anchor Seal. I then wrapped the outside from rim to bottom edge with shrink wrap. I then moved them out of my unheated garage shop where the humidity is higher here in the Seattle area and into the house where the the the humidity is lower. Is this a recipe for success, or is there other things that I could do to improve my chances for drying bowls without cracks?
Back to top
  
 
IP Logged
 
Register To Remove Ads
robo_hippy
WR Addict
*****
Offline



Posts: 2,564

Eugene, OR, USA
Eugene, OR
USA

Re: Drying Bowls and Shrink Wrap
Reply #1 - Nov 17th, 2015 at 2:07pm
 
I would keep them in the garage. Rule #1 for drying: Too fast and it cracks. Rule #2: too slow and it molds/rots. Rounding over the edges is a big help. The stretch wrap on the rim helps to protect the rim, which is the most vulnerable spot. Elm generally dries without too much trouble. Not so sure about sweet gum, but sweet gum will spault easily. I would leave them in the garage for a month or 6, then bring them inside. Drying inside the house, it can be too warm and dry them too fast. I turn green to final thickness, and keep them on the concrete floor for the first few days. Dry in 1 to 2 weeks max.

If you are ever down Eugene way, the shop is open most of the time, and I welcome visitors, even if you are a Husky, or a Cougar, or Beaver...

robo hippy
Back to top
« Last Edit: Nov 17th, 2015 at 2:08pm by robo_hippy »  
WWW  
IP Logged
 
Breck Whitworth
WR Supporter
*****
Offline


WR Rocks!

Posts: 2,222

Gulfport, Mississippi, USA
Gulfport
Mississippi
USA

Gender: male

PM 3520-B
Re: Drying Bowls and Shrink Wrap
Reply #2 - Nov 30th, 2015 at 11:25pm
 
Tracy,
  I do about the same thing here in the deep south I coat all my wet turned bowls inside and out with anchor seal then wrap the bowl in brown paper. I take the brown paper off after a couple of months because it is only needed in the beginning to slow down the initial water loss. After a couple of months the bowls need more air to dry properly. Leaving on your shrink wrap may encourage black mold. Which in sweet gum that can be a good thing because the spalting increases the beauty. I have found it is not good to let my wet bowls dry inside where the air conditioning removes humidity and causes my bowls to dry faster thus more chance of cracks. I only bring them in when I have finished turned them and they have a coat of finish on them. Hope this helps give you more info. Thumbs Up
Back to top
  

May the Lord Bless the work of our hands! And Necessity is the mother of invention:
 
IP Logged
 
Tracy Tame
Junior Member
*
Offline


HELP! I'm being Sucked
into the Vortex

Posts: 37

Shoreline, WA, Washington, USA
Shoreline, WA
Washington
USA

Gender: male
Re: Drying Bowls and Shrink Wrap
Reply #3 - Dec 2nd, 2015 at 11:53am
 
Thanks Guys. I returned the bowls to the garage and removed the wrap from the Elm bowls, they had lots of black mold, which I removed by returning. The Sweet Gum bowls looked just fine so I left on the wrap. I need to be more patient.
Back to top
  
 
IP Logged
 
robo_hippy
WR Addict
*****
Offline



Posts: 2,564

Eugene, OR, USA
Eugene, OR
USA

Re: Drying Bowls and Shrink Wrap
Reply #4 - Dec 2nd, 2015 at 1:14pm
 
I don't know how effective the plastic wrap is for twice turned bowls. It is a necessity for my once turned bowls (green to final thickness, warp and dry, then sand and finish), especially woods that like to crack like Pacific Madrone. You could probably throw in a lot of fruit woods here as well. The rim is the most vulnerable spot because you can't maintain any wall thickness there. This is part of why we round over the edges. The sharp edge will cut, and being sharp, it is way more vulnerable to uneven drying. This is part of why drying is an art, rather than science because every piece of every tree, and every species is different. Elm is good at resisting cracks.

robo hippy
Back to top
  
WWW  
IP Logged
 
Page Index Toggle Pages: 1
Send Topic Print