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How is this made? (Read 1,699 times)
 
Ed Weber
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Re: How is this made?
Reply #15 - May 12th, 2016 at 3:37pm
 
Julian Roslanowski wrote on May 12th, 2016 at 3:15pm:
I think the biggest challenge would be to cut each segment to ensure each notch within each segment is uniform (centered)


Make a jig with a triangle piece laying flat with the point up. Then you can place the segment upside down over the point securing it in place to cut the miter. (think box joint jig)This would need to be done for both sides. once tuned up, it would be easy to cut multiple segments easily.
That was just one way I was thinking of, I would have to actually attempt to build this feature to satisfy myself with how I would do it.
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Walt
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Re: How is this made?
Reply #16 - May 14th, 2016 at 2:20pm
 
You can use the wedgie sled to do it all it is that versital.  I have two, one for vertical cuts and for compound cuts.
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Ed Weber
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Re: How is this made?
Reply #17 - May 14th, 2016 at 4:52pm
 
Walt wrote on May 14th, 2016 at 2:20pm:
You can use the wedgie sled to do it all it is that versital.  I have two, one for vertical cuts and for compound cuts


Walt, are you saying you would use the wedgie sled for cutting the v notch in the center of each segment?
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Bruce Kamp
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Re: How is this made?
Reply #18 - May 15th, 2016 at 11:12am
 
I think I could see how one could use the Segmented Project Planner to get the angles for both the dark and light pieces. I think you would set the incline angle so that the compound segments lie flat. Then, wouldn't the dark pieces be cut at the miter angle defined?
The outside of the ring could then be either side grain or end grain.
I haven't tried this but it seems to make sense.
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Bruce Kamp
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Re: How is this made?
Reply #19 - May 15th, 2016 at 11:17am
 
Also, I haven't figured out how to use the wedgie sled to do the compound miters yet. I asked Bill  Kandler and he could not tell me. Has anyone figured it out?
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Julian Roslanowski
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Re: How is this made?
Reply #20 - May 15th, 2016 at 7:39pm
 
Bruce, In Jerry Bennett's last video he explains how to do this.  The compound miter angle is achieved by tilting the saw blade.  You cut half the segments on the 'primary" fence and the other half of the segments on the "complementary" fence.  Then you measure the gap between the primary and complementary pieces to cut the triangles. The end result is a ring with triangular pieces.

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Ed Weber
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Re: How is this made?
Reply #21 - May 16th, 2016 at 8:25am
 

The piece in the OP has "standard" brick-lay segments, nothing complicated. The only question is/was how to go about cutting the V shaped notch in the segments. This is pretty much the key to the "look" of this piece
This can be done in any number of ways, of which we discussed a few.

If I understand the method you are currently discussing, (making a ring with triangles with the wedgie sled) this is not the same as the original piece. In some circumstances it may have some similarities bit not at all be the same or have the same look. There is a reason this piece stands out, and a lot of it has to do with the construction technique being incorporated into the design. If you change any aspect of this (where the joints are) you will invariably change the look.

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Julian Roslanowski
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Re: How is this made?
Reply #22 - May 16th, 2016 at 11:54am
 
Ed, I don't see a problem with changing the construction technique.  I believe the end result will be similar and there will be a slightly different look but that doesn't mean it would not be visually appealing. My goal is to try and make the construction easier and achieve a similar look.  I don't want to make a duplicate of someone else's work.  This will be added to my list of "turnings to make". Smiley
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Ed Weber
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Re: How is this made?
Reply #23 - May 16th, 2016 at 1:49pm
 
Julian Roslanowski wrote on May 16th, 2016 at 11:54am:
Ed, I don't see a problem with changing the construction technique.  I believe the end result will be similar and there will be a slightly different look but that doesn't mean it would not be visually appealing.


How you want to build it is up to you, whether it looks good, well you'll know when you're complete  I wasn't saying it wouldn't look good, just different.
I was just sharing a word of caution.
Not everyone is aware that wood species,  grain direction, even chatoyance are all an integral part of this pieces appeal, along with construction. If constructed differently, (joints in different place) even using the same wood species,  it may not have the same look.

I'm all for you building your own version, go for it.
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