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Re-chucking existing work piece (Read 509 times)
 
Steve Dodson
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Re-chucking existing work piece
May 11th, 2016 at 12:08pm
 
Greetings -
Am pretty much a newbie, dealing with the likes of salt and pepper grinders and other small projects. I have a heck of a time re-chucking an existing project whether it be in a three jaw chuck or a jam chuck , etc. Is it just me or am I doing something wrong being the beginner I am? I can never get things to be properly aligned and always have to take a few passes to get things to spin without any noticeable 'wobble'... 
Thanks in advance,
SWD
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Glenn Jacobs
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Re: Re-chucking existing work piece
Reply #1 - May 11th, 2016 at 12:28pm
 
Steve, Welcome. If you're using a 3 jaw chuck, that could be the problem. They are not normally syncronized to close at same time. Most of us use a 4 jaw chuck. The jaws close at same time. What are you using in tailstock to align free end?

Glenn J.
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Al Wasser
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Re: Re-chucking existing work piece
Reply #2 - May 11th, 2016 at 1:18pm
 
Get yourself a 4 jaw chusk made for wood turning.  Even then it is best not to take something off the chuck unless you wave to.  The work will often not run true when rechucked.  It helps some to use a pencil and mark the location of the number one jaws. (On a wood chuck, each of the jaws are numbered)
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Ken Vaughan
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Re: Re-chucking existing work piece
Reply #3 - May 11th, 2016 at 11:25pm
 

Work holding is sometimes a significant challenge.   There are often several different ways of doing the holding. 

For example I use aluminum bushings to hold and turn peppermill bodies, and may be the only one here to do that.  The bushings fit between a dead center in the head stock and a 60 degree live center in the tailstock.   The bushings and body are pencil    marked to minimize changes when recounting.

Very small changes become large with length.

Plan and design processes to be repeatable, or plan to finish at one operation.
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Ed Weber
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Re: Re-chucking existing work piece
Reply #4 - May 12th, 2016 at 10:27am
 
Steve Dodson wrote on May 11th, 2016 at 12:08pm:
I have a heck of a time re-chucking an existing project whether it be in a three jaw chuck or a jam chuck , etc.  Is it just me or am I doing something wrong being the beginner I am?  I can never get things to be properly aligned and always have to take a few passes to get things to spin without any noticeable 'wobble'..


Regardless of how you're holding or re-chucking your work, there are a couple of things you can do to help minimize the problems you're having.
Mark the centers, usually turners will mark the center of their turning with the point of the tailstock. Also, as mentioned, mark (a sharpie works well) the position of the #1 jaw, so that when you remount the piece, your registering the wood into the same position.
There are many other ways of centering pieces, tail-stock cones, interior and exterior work well.

Having to true up a piece after re-chucking is not uncommon. one reason is because wood moves.
Wood moves mainly form drying but also from being worked. Sometimes when turning, you're removing wood that releases internal stress and can cause the wood to move.
With practice you'll not have to take as many (if any) passes to have your piece run true.
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