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Standards and defects (Read 826 times)
 
Jennifer Hasan
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Standards and defects
Jun 10th, 2016 at 9:34pm
 
I'm making a salad bowl set for someone in Canada. It includes one big bowl, six smaller bowls and serving utensils.

On one of the small bowls, I went too deep so a small part (size of a dime) of the bottom is now paper thin. I put a thick layer of epoxy resin underneath to provide support and it worked.

Even though the epoxy resin worked, I now consider the bowl to be defective and don't feel right selling it, but maybe my standards are too high and it would be considered within reason and acceptable.

I understand that everyone needs to decide for themselves what they will and won't sell but I'm curious to know what other people think regarding what is acceptable.


Thanks.



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Ron Sardo
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Re: Standards and defects
Reply #1 - Jun 10th, 2016 at 10:08pm
 
I think you already know the answer to this.

No reason to lower your standards, if you think its defective (or need to ask) it is.
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Jennifer Hasan
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Re: Standards and defects
Reply #2 - Jun 11th, 2016 at 4:10am
 
thanks Ron. I agree.

Maybe I gave too much context, which confused the question, which is what do you guys think regarding what is acceptable to sell. Where do you draw the line, especially if you sell online where the customer can't really see or feel the item because good photography can hide defects?





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Ralph Fahringer
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Re: Standards and defects
Reply #3 - Jun 11th, 2016 at 8:21am
 
Honesty should always be your first policy!!

If you still want to sell a bowl with the defect you describe, then describe it that way and offer it as a "seconds" piece with a lower price.

Some people would still like to own a bowl and a lower price might get them on board..so to speak.

If I really liked how a bowl looked and knew there was a defect in the bottom that the seller had reinforced to make the piece usable, i would probably still buy it at a lower price than his top level pieces.

NEVER sell something with false advertising... shooting it to hide any defects is false advertising and pretty sleezy in my mind.

If I got a piece that way and found the defect, I'd be inclined to  hunt the seller down and make them eat it....but that's just the "Jersey" in me coming out. Thumbs Up
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Ed Weber
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Re: Standards and defects
Reply #4 - Jun 11th, 2016 at 8:39am
 
Jennifer Hasan wrote on Jun 10th, 2016 at 9:34pm:
I now consider the bowl to be defective and don't feel right selling it


I think you answered your own question.
You can always send along the "extra" bowl as a freebie and tell/show what can happen when you order a handmade item.
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« Last Edit: Jun 11th, 2016 at 8:39am by Ed Weber »  
 
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Ron Sardo
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Re: Standards and defects
Reply #5 - Jun 11th, 2016 at 9:01am
 
Personally, I wouldn't sell anything I thought was defective, even as a second.

I might maybe give it to a good friend or relative if they noticed it and mentioned that they like it. I would point out the defect then ask them if they wanted it. I would also not sign the piece. I wouldn't want anything out there that I thought was subpar.
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Chris Neilan
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Re: Standards and defects
Reply #6 - Jun 11th, 2016 at 5:46pm
 
Ron Sardo wrote on Jun 11th, 2016 at 9:01am:
Personally, I wouldn't sell anything I thought was defective, even as a second.

I might maybe give it to a good friend or relative if they noticed it and mentioned that they like it. I would point out the defect then ask them if they wanted it. I would also not sign the piece. I wouldn't want anything out there that I thought was subpar.



+1

I agree, and i have never tried to sell any of my work, ...... Yet!  Wink
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« Last Edit: Jun 11th, 2016 at 5:47pm by Chris Neilan »  

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Paul Roberts
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Re: Standards and defects
Reply #7 - Jun 11th, 2016 at 6:18pm
 
Once in a great while, we will have a piece that checks or cracks. We note that "Defect" on the price tag, & mark it down about 50%. Generally, the piece sells very quickly.

If the "Defect" is anything more than very minor, the bowl becomes a platter, or saucer.
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Ron Sardo
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Re: Standards and defects
Reply #8 - Jun 11th, 2016 at 6:45pm
 
Paul Roberts wrote on Jun 11th, 2016 at 6:18pm:
If the "Defect" is anything more than very minor, the bowl becomes a platter, or saucer.


Or a lamp shade
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Ed Weber
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Re: Standards and defects
Reply #9 - Jun 11th, 2016 at 7:54pm
 
Ron Sardo wrote on Jun 11th, 2016 at 9:01am:
I would also not sign the piece.


+1
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John Grace
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Re: Standards and defects
Reply #10 - Aug 6th, 2016 at 6:05pm
 
I agree that you answered your own question...it bothered you enough to ask so perhaps re-do that one.  But I also agree with Ed and give it as a 'throw in'.  Like all of us before, I had the absolutely beautiful piece a while back that in the final stages of preparation developed a hairline crack and just couldn't figure out a proper way to glue it such that it was salvageable.  I was ready to chuck it when the wife saw it and said as a 'user piece' most women wouldn't care in the least about the crack if was disclosed up front.  So in the end, I ended up with three pieces all with small hairline cracks that wouldn't harm the rest of the piece.  Sold each of the three for $20 each, explained to each of the women that I'd put an extra heavy coat of wax on the piece and explained that the bowl may last a couple of months of ten years.  Each woman walked away thinking she'd gotten a steal.  For myself, while I was glad that I didn't have to throw the pieces away I did receive satisfaction from the fact that these three women bought something they seemed truly thrilled with, defects and all.
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