Woodturner's Resource
Woodturner's Resource  
  Featured Artist    Websites   Support Wr
Tutorials, Projects & Tips   Event Calendar   Tool and Book Store
  Home Page Forum HelpSearch Map TPT Resources LoginRegister
 
Page Index Toggle Pages: 1
Send Topic Print
Wood selection preferences (Read 365 times)
 
Chris Neilan
WR Supporter
*****
Offline


OUCH!

Posts: 793

Waterford, Connecticut, USA
Waterford
Connecticut
USA

Gender: male

Powermatic 3520
Delta 46-460
Shopsmith 10 ER
Shopsmith Mark V
Shopsmith Mark 7 Powerpro
Wood selection preferences
Oct 2nd, 2016 at 1:26pm
 
What are your favorite wood combiinations  for segmenting? What woods don't play well with others?
Back to top
  

Delta 46-460: awesome
Powermatic 3520: more awesome!
Shopsmith Mark 7: Wonderful! (But I don't use it as a lathe yet)
Shopsmith Mark V
Shopsmith 10ER
 
IP Logged
 
Register To Remove Ads
Rob Grindler
Senior Member
****
Offline



Posts: 250

kelowna, British Columbia, Canada
kelowna
British Columbia
Canada

Gender: male
Re: Wood selection preferences
Reply #1 - Oct 2nd, 2016 at 1:46pm
 
For me it depends on what is readily available for free,or cheap.In my area dark hardwoods are hard to come by.I have gotten some Mahogany and Oak from pallet boards.I like Elm from a tree I cut down in my yard, and Cedar is readily available here for cheap so use it some, for a darker wood ,with my Elm or   pine which is also lots of in my area.
I would love to use exotic dark hardwoods ,but to expensive for me to buy.I bought a 4FT length of Purple Heart for 40 bucks so used it sparingly .
Back to top
  
 
IP Logged
 
Ed Weber
WR Global Moderator
WR Patron
*****
Offline



Posts: 4,865

Wilton, California, USA
Wilton
California
USA

Gender: male

JET 1642
Grizzly G0584
Re: Wood selection preferences
Reply #2 - Oct 2nd, 2016 at 1:55pm
 
Chris Neilan wrote on Oct 2nd, 2016 at 1:26pm:
What woods don't play well with others?


I "assume" you're talking about construction rather than aesthetics.

It's really no different than anything else, most species behave in the same way they would as if you were turning a solid piece, there are always exceptions.

The more oily wood (tropicals) are the ones that may give you adhesion issues if you don't clean them well before gluing.

Some woods, like Redheart, Bloodwood and others with a high amount of pigment can bleed into adjoining woods.

Using an extremely hard wood adjacent next to a soft wood (janka scale) can be difficult to turn.

The list goes on and on.

It's all experimentation to a certain degree when dealing with a natural product. There are classic combinations like walnut and maple that look and work well together.
IMO, the majority of of information on segmenting has to be experienced.
Back to top
  
 
IP Logged
 
Ron Sardo
WR Administrator
WR Patron
*****
Offline


Chief cook and bottle
washer

Posts: 9,285

Drums, Pennsylvania, USA
Drums
Pennsylvania
USA


PM 3520
Re: Wood selection preferences
Reply #3 - Oct 2nd, 2016 at 3:31pm
 
Rob Grindler wrote on Oct 2nd, 2016 at 1:46pm:
I have gotten some Mahogany and Oak from pallet boards.

Be careful with wood from pallets. Many, if not all, have been fumigated with highly toxic insecticides to prevent transporting insects to other regions.

When you cut into or turn the treated wood you are releasing the chemicals into the air where they can be inhaled. If your shop is in the basement of your home (like mine) its even possible that the toxic chemicals can migrate into your living area.

You'll know its too late to do anything when you start growing a purple tail.

Chris Neilan wrote on Oct 2nd, 2016 at 1:26pm:
What are your favorite wood combinations for segmenting?


Basically you want contrasting woods. Think of the different colors of wood as a paint pallet to make pleasing combinations.

Here are a few to get you started.
Maple and cherry
Bubinga, maple and ebony
Walnut and maple
Ebony and holly

Back to top
  

Multimedia File Viewing and Clickable Links are available for Registered Members only!!  You need to Login or Register
WWW  
IP Logged
 
Rob Grindler
Senior Member
****
Offline



Posts: 250

kelowna, British Columbia, Canada
kelowna
British Columbia
Canada

Gender: male
Re: Wood selection preferences
Reply #4 - Oct 2nd, 2016 at 5:17pm
 
Ron Sardo wrote on Oct 2nd, 2016 at 3:31pm:
Rob Grindler wrote on Oct 2nd, 2016 at 1:46pm:
I have gotten some Mahogany and Oak from pallet boards.

Be careful with wood from pallets. Many, if not all, have been fumigated with highly toxic insecticides to prevent transporting insects to other regions.



That scared me, so I did a little googling.Maybe the U.S. does things different,but in Canada this what I found out;
But you do have to watch out for nails,embedded rocks and other materials.Or I guess there could have been something toxic spilled on it along the way.


Pallet Myths

There are many rumors circulating about dangers of using wooden pallets in the home because they are pressure treated. They are NOT pressure treated and most pallets in Canada are safe for use in and around the home.

Wooden pallets in manufactured Canada or the States for international trade undergo a pest control treatment called heat treating which involves heating the pallet to minimum core temperature of 56C for softwoods and 60C for hardwoods for a minimum of 30 minutes in a kiln. This kills any pests that may have been living in the wood, reducing the risk of cross-border pest contamination. Heat-treated pallets are not harmful to your health.

There is another form of wood treatment called methyl-bromide fumigation. This type of treatment is banned in Canada because it poses a health risk to workers handling the pallets. If you find a methyl bromide fumigated pallet, please do not use it around the home or as firewood, find a waste-removal company who can dispose of it properly. Multimedia File Viewing and Clickable Links are available for Registered Members only!!  You need to Login or Register
Back to top
  
 
IP Logged
 
Ron Sardo
WR Administrator
WR Patron
*****
Offline


Chief cook and bottle
washer

Posts: 9,285

Drums, Pennsylvania, USA
Drums
Pennsylvania
USA


PM 3520
Re: Wood selection preferences
Reply #5 - Oct 2nd, 2016 at 5:34pm
 
Well yes and no.

Methyl-bromide fumigation was used in the States until December 2015. The problem is that pallets are reused many times and may last anywhere from 1 month to many years

Wood pallets that have been fumigated will have this logo stamped/burned on the side

Multimedia File Viewing and Clickable Links are available for Registered Members only!!  You need to Login or Register

Since Canada and the US have an agreement pallets can move freely and are not often checked.
Back to top
  

Multimedia File Viewing and Clickable Links are available for Registered Members only!!  You need to Login or Register
WWW  
IP Logged
 
Rob Grindler
Senior Member
****
Offline



Posts: 250

kelowna, British Columbia, Canada
kelowna
British Columbia
Canada

Gender: male
Re: Wood selection preferences
Reply #6 - Oct 2nd, 2016 at 5:51pm
 
Ron Sardo wrote on Oct 2nd, 2016 at 5:34pm:
Well yes and no.

Methyl-bromide fumigation was used in the States until December 2015. The problem is that pallets are reused many times and may last anywhere from 1 month to many years

Wood pallets that have been fumigated will have this logo stamped/burned on the side

Multimedia File Viewing and Clickable Links are available for Registered Members only!!  You need to Login or Register

Since Canada and the US have an agreement pallets can move freely and are not often checked.


All good to know Thumbs Up,so far I have no purple tails from 20 some odd years of using pallet wood for various things.
Back to top
  
 
IP Logged
 
Page Index Toggle Pages: 1
Send Topic Print