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What would you sell this for? (Read 1,997 times)
 
Andrew Abercrombie
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What would you sell this for?
Nov 18th, 2016 at 3:23pm
 
Just finished my nicest bowl yet. An 8" tamarack bowl finished with plan beeswax. My wife wants to keep it of course so I'll let her. I am curious what something like this would sell for?

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Don Stephan
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Re: What would you sell this for?
Reply #1 - Nov 18th, 2016 at 8:30pm
 
Andrew

If you look on Etsy, or at craft shows, you might find an 8" bowl being sold for $25 or $30, but probably not with just a wax finish which doesn't allow the bowl to have much of a function other than decoration.  Doesn't mean that's all the bowl is worth, or that no one would pay more, just what some people price bowls.
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Buck Nemitt
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Re: What would you sell this for?
Reply #2 - Nov 18th, 2016 at 9:33pm
 
Don't know about a price but a nice round piece of Cork would work and look well in the bottom where your Chuck held. Very interesting figure in your bowl which would be nice to throw some packaged candy in --
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What the heck,Give it a try---
 
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Andrew Abercrombie
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Re: What would you sell this for?
Reply #3 - Nov 18th, 2016 at 10:59pm
 
Don- didn't realize there needed to be a "function" my intent was purely decoration. What would you recommend for finishes for the item(s) to be functional?
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Jenny Trice
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Re: What would you sell this for?
Reply #4 - Nov 19th, 2016 at 6:57am
 
Love the tamarack wood.  Nice job on the bowl.  I agree with the previous comments re: price.
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Louie Powell
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Re: What would you sell this for?
Reply #5 - Nov 19th, 2016 at 8:09am
 
Don Stephan wrote on Nov 18th, 2016 at 8:30pm:
Andrew

If you look on Etsy, or at craft shows, you might find an 8" bowl being sold for $25 or $30, but probably not with just a wax finish which doesn't allow the bowl to have much of a function other than decoration.  Doesn't mean that's all the bowl is worth, or that no one would pay more, just what some people price bowls.


Many makers of strictly utilitarian pieces used only a beeswax finish (including Richard Raffen who says that's the best finish for a cereal bowl).

I've seen bowls like this with a beeswax finish for $70-100 at craft fairs.


My question relates to the knots in the wood.  Most of the utilitarian bowls I've seen have been made of fairly bland wood that doesn't have a lot of knots.  I would be concerned about how the long term use of a bowl with knots - are the knots sealed so that liquids can't seep into the boundaries between the knots and the wood? 

The knots in the timber would suggest that might be more of a display piece.  However, it might still be possible use this for utility purposes if you seal those knots with CA or epoxy before applying the beeswax finish, but the eventual owner will need to be very careful to not let liquids just sit in the bowl for extended periods.
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« Last Edit: Nov 19th, 2016 at 8:15am by Louie Powell »  

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Ed Weber
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Re: What would you sell this for?
Reply #6 - Nov 19th, 2016 at 11:08am
 
This Topic was moved here from Turning Talk by Ed Weber.
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Ed Weber
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Re: What would you sell this for?
Reply #7 - Nov 19th, 2016 at 12:11pm
 
Andrew Abercrombie wrote on Nov 18th, 2016 at 3:23pm:
Just finished my nicest bowl yet. An 8" tamarack bowl finished with plan beeswax. My wife wants to keep it of course so I'll let her. I am curious what something like this would sell for?


Hey Andrew, I moved your post because it's more of a marketing question and as such will be getting a bit of a critique to figure out the cost.
First of all, it's a nice looking bowl.
Secondly, there is no easy answer like "it's worth $__"
Everything from wood species, size, shape, execution, finish and what the market will bear, come into play when trying to price your piece.
I would also do some investigating on ETSY, but don't get discouraged. Make sure you look and see if that seller has actually sold something at that price.
Find several pieces as similar to yours as possible and then do your comparisons.

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Don Stephan
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Re: What would you sell this for?
Reply #8 - Nov 20th, 2016 at 11:04am
 
Andrew

You will find extensive helpful discussion on type types of finishes, application methods, and use suitability in archived discussions of this section of Woodturner's Resource.  You will find differences of opinion, which is healthy and helpful as well.  When I first discovered this web site, I spent many many hours first reading through archived discussions in the various sections for the fast exposure to cumulative experience and opinion.
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Re: What would you sell this for?
Reply #9 - Nov 20th, 2016 at 3:06pm
 
Andrew

I will say this.

1.  Depends on location.  California, New York, or other wealthy cities.
2. Size of bowl and function of it.
3. Who is making it.

There are lot of Pro turners who make functional bowls for a living.  There are a lot of well known turners who people buy normal bowls for HIGH prices just for collector items only.

Now of us normal people in non wealthy cities and normal domestic woods it would go for maybe $25 to $35.

A lot of people are not looking for Big bowls most of the time in the over 12" range since they take up to much room, unless of course something else Artsy is put in it and hung on the wall.

Now yours with all the knots tho looks nice I am pretty sure it will crack in the future unless CA glue was applied to hold them in.  So even tho someone will buy it and then later find it is cracking in several places will put off the buyer from the seller in the future. 

This is just part of selling and if you and if you Google you will find out a lot in YouTube videos for sure.

So all and all I would not sell it and either give it away or keep it and only sell that which will make buyers want to come back time after time.

Arlin
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« Last Edit: Nov 20th, 2016 at 3:15pm by Arlin Eastman »  

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Re: What would you sell this for?
Reply #10 - Nov 21st, 2016 at 1:36pm
 
What happened to "Diameter X $10.00 USD= price?"

This would make your 8 inch bowl be priced at $80.00
I would not be afraid of the knots. Most of my bowls have something similar. I do finish with Poly though.

Glenn J.
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Ed Weber
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Re: What would you sell this for?
Reply #11 - Nov 21st, 2016 at 1:54pm
 
Glenn Jacobs wrote on Nov 21st, 2016 at 1:36pm:
What happened to "Diameter X $10.00 USD= price?"


Glenn, I forgot to mention that as a starting point.
IMO, you do have to add and subtract from the basic sum, depending on the piece
Examples,
you may have to subtract  XX $ because it only has a wax finish.
You may have to add xx $ because the wood has visual interest.
and so on
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Don Stephan
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Re: What would you sell this for?
Reply #12 - Nov 21st, 2016 at 8:02pm
 
Adding diameter to height might be a better approximation of the work that went into a bowl, instead of just using the diameter.
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John Cepko
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Re: What would you sell this for?
Reply #13 - Nov 23rd, 2016 at 3:40pm
 
Also what I paid/had to go through to get the blank.
Some bowl blanks can get pricey, and at $35 bucks, that doesn't leave much for time and other materials.
OTOH, a free , or waste chunk of wood, I might be apt to let it go for a little less.
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Re: What would you sell this for?
Reply #14 - Nov 23rd, 2016 at 4:36pm
 
JMO (and maybe some facts)

Don Stephan wrote on Nov 21st, 2016 at 8:02pm:
Adding diameter to height might be a better approximation of the work that went into a bowl, instead of just using the diameter.


You still need a starting place.
$10 per inch of diameter is the starting place. If you think a deeper bowl should cost more then add $__  to the base price for a deeper bowl. Keep in mind, price doesn't always increase in conjunction with size.

John Cepko wrote on Nov 23rd, 2016 at 3:40pm:
Also what I paid/had to go through to get the blank.
Some bowl blanks can get pricey, and at $35 bucks, that doesn't leave much for time and other materials.


Unless you have rare, exotic wood and/or are willing to tell stories about how it came into being. (all in order to raise your price) no one cares what you paid in time & materials, sorry that's how it is sometimes.
It's really what the market will bear, it doesn't matter if you paid $79.99 in T&M or $9.00 in T&M, an $80 bowl is still an $80 bowl.
Just because someone puts a price on a piece, doesn't mean they'll get it, no matter what the profit margin.

John Cepko wrote on Nov 23rd, 2016 at 3:40pm:
OTOH, a free , or waste chunk of wood, I might be apt to let it go for a little less.


I would never lower my asking price because I paid less for T&M.
I have wood that I purchased many years ago, some has doubled in price. If I sell a piece today, I ask for today's prices, not less because I paid less for the materials years ago when I bought it.
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Re: What would you sell this for?
Reply #15 - Nov 23rd, 2016 at 7:42pm
 
I also would never lower a price just because it is Free wood.  To me it is cutting your profit and everyone else who sells them.  Buyers will think that all of the turnings should be in that range of lets say $15 for a small box made out of Pine or out of Ebony or even if there is embellishment's on the pine box or there are a ton of options

But never lower a price because the wood is cheap or free
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Re: What would you sell this for?
Reply #16 - Nov 24th, 2016 at 11:26am
 
Free wood ain't free, there's a cost in getting it home and in usable shape. But that's half the fun.
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Re: What would you sell this for?
Reply #17 - Nov 25th, 2016 at 8:54am
 
My guesstimate is, picking up a section of log or large branch no more than 5 miles away, studying the ends for optimal pith-removing cuts, and quickly knocking off the corners averages about an hour per salad mixing bowl blank.  Sure it can be done more quickly, but off-center grain pattern in the bottom of the bowl, or unbalanced sapwood-heartwood mix, makes a less attractive bowl in my opinion.
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Re: What would you sell this for?
Reply #18 - Nov 25th, 2016 at 10:50am
 
There are few in marketing hang in on this topic.

A marketing person does not mess with formulas.  It is all about what the buyer is willing to pay and what the seller is willing to accept.  Assume negotiations (or haggling in some form).

If the seller brings skills and reputation, the buyer may be willing to pay more.  Local market sets a norm or average, but a seller should seek to beat the norm.   

A craftsperson will generate less price buzz than an artist.  Utility generates less excitement than art.

Here in alaska, the comparison is to Amazon prime for utility and generic art, so the artist needs to be seen as more than a comodity producer.

The challenge is most of us just ain't sales people and under price and under haggle.

So set your price higher and be willing to haggle a bit, unless you are in a gallery.
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Re: What would you sell this for?
Reply #19 - Nov 25th, 2016 at 1:36pm
 
Ken Vaughan wrote on Nov 25th, 2016 at 10:50am:
So set your price higher and be willing to haggle a bit, unless you are in a gallery.

Its easier to lower your price than it is to raise your price.
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Gary D Baker
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Re: What would you sell this for?
Reply #20 - Nov 25th, 2016 at 10:58pm
 
That bowl is worth what you can get for it.  If you take the time you spent to make it and the cost of the wood you don't even have a place to start.  Who is going to pay you for the last 15 bowls that split or flew apart on the lathe.  Who pays for the sandpaper and finishes.  What about replacing tools, electricity, bags for shavings and gas to go find wood ... and chainsaw chains and trips to the emergency room.  Show expenses, travel expenses.   I've had all those expenses in the last month.  And More.

The bowl is still only worth what someone will pay for it ... and to find that out, you have to go out and present it to customers and let them tell you yea or nay.  If you calculate the cost of the wood and time to make it alone, you will not begin to cover what you have in it.  To arrive at this piece of wood you are selling today, all the other man hours and expenses have to be covered. 

So the only way to come out is to price the wood at what you think a customer will pay.  That may be quite a bit higher than your calculations of cost of wood and time might dictate.  The way that you can make money is to present a quality product that has such character, such temptation and promise of enduring beauty that the customer will pay what you ask.  Then, you will cover the cost of those bad decisions, bad pieces of wood and tool replacements.  The attendance to bad shows, emergency room co-pays won't be quite so painful.

But, if the customer won't pay what you think it is worth, you may have to reduce the price to sell it.  Then, all that time and expense comes back into play.  So, if you are going to sell that bowl to someone realize that there is no formula for size, or your cost of making the product that is workable for what we do. We make art ... some good art ... some bad.  Good sells ... bad don't.

That is a nice bowl.  Your wife is paying you a wonderful compliment.  Give it to her.  Doing so will probably make her happy and make it easier for you to buy more stuff to allow you to sink further into the vortex.
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Re: What would you sell this for?
Reply #21 - Nov 26th, 2016 at 6:31am
 
Well said Gary  +1
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Ed Weber
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Re: What would you sell this for?
Reply #22 - Nov 26th, 2016 at 10:41am
 
Gary D Baker wrote on Nov 25th, 2016 at 10:58pm:
hat bowl is worth what you can get for it.


This is what I said earlier
"It's really what the market will bear, it doesn't matter if you paid $79.99 in T&M or $9.00 in T&M, an $80 bowl is still an $80 bowl."

While Gary went into some detail, whether you acknowledge it or not all those factors are in the cost of the bowl, not what price you sell it for but the actual cost it took to get a finished product.

You can use formulas, haggle or whatever you want to do, bottom line is get more dollars out of it than you put into it.

Costing a piece is a science
Selling or marketing a piece is an art

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Re: What would you sell this for?
Reply #23 - Feb 17th, 2017 at 8:48pm
 
What the market will bear really...
start out at $25 if it sells without the customer himming or hawing over the price it was too low.
I call a bowl like that a "Carlin Bowl."  From one of George Carlin's comedy routines "A Place for my stuff" Roll Eyes
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Re: What would you sell this for?
Reply #24 - Apr 16th, 2017 at 6:35pm
 
Pricing pieces for sale can be a daunting task when you account for materials, geography, hobby vs profession, etc etc.  I just completed another local market two weeks ago and sold just over half my inventory, coming away with just over $350.  I appreciate that my prices are incredibly low but that's also a function of my location, small town clientele, that this is a hobby of mine without a goal of actually making much money, as well as there's no other local competition that I feel I'm under-cutting.

As I said, for me...turning is a hobby I love and selling some pieces keeps me and my pieces out of the dog house with my wife as she was getting frustrated with the build-up of my 'stuff' before I started selling some locally.  And whereas I like to think I've gotten better and better at my turning over the years I turn mostly 'user' pieces of bowls, platters, and glass coasters, etc.  So in the end, I admit I'm happier selling 10 pieces for $250 total as opposed to 5 pieces at $50 each.

In the end...it's the objective numbers of costs contrasted with the subjective dynamic of what you want to get out of it.  For me, I'm just happy when a customer proclaims they've found the perfect $30 gift for an upcoming friend's birthday or shower.
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