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Using a Plane (Read 586 times)
 
Mike Turner
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Using a Plane
Nov 20th, 2016 at 9:39am
 
I have never used a plane...dont have one in the shop but this looks interesting. I make wooden flutes so it could be of some interest or help..Whats your idea? What kind of plane would work best for me as a another tool in flutemaking...not necessarily on the lathe but a plane to use when I couldnt turn in on the lathe like maybe if I had a piece of wood that had a bow in it? I have a piece of cedar I experimented with boring it and letting it dry and it bowed but is still a nice piece.I think it will make a good flute but just has a bend in it.(I love a challenge sometime.)  What about a spokeshave?
As far as planes go I know very little as there are so many kinds.I dont really want a really expensive one ..just one to remove material and have a good finish.
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« Last Edit: Nov 20th, 2016 at 10:44am by Mike Turner »  
 
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Mike Mills
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Re: Using a Plane
Reply #1 - Nov 20th, 2016 at 10:21am
 
Interesting idea....
I assume most/all have high carbon steel since they are honed and used at very low cutting speeds. It did cut the green wood in the video very nice but not sure how the cutting edge will hold up with hard dry wood and high speeds.
You should be able to pick up a low angle block plane for under $30.
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Re: Using a Plane
Reply #2 - Nov 20th, 2016 at 10:58am
 
One can spend on a small block plane perhaps as little as $25 and as much as $150 or more, and unfortunately you get what you pay for, in terms of blade holding an edge, ease of adjustment, et cetera.  My experience has always been I was spending my time working on inexpensive planes and working with Lie Nielsen hand planes.

The difference between green and hard wood may be similar for hand planes as for lathe tools, I've never used a hand plane on green wood.
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Ken Vaughan
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Re: Using a Plane
Reply #3 - Nov 20th, 2016 at 11:37am
 

Mike, please do not try to use a conventional wood plane on a lathe under power.  A lot of bad things can happen and catches are easy.

That said, I do use hand planes to put flat spots or facets on turnings as an alternative to abrasives.  Have also used them instead of power tools in preparing stock.

I like making shavings with spoke shaves and drawknives and they can be useful in uncovering where the best chance of finding a treasure in a turning (or a fatal flaw).

Lee Valley Veritas planes and spokeshaves are a good way to start with good quality, choice of steel blades, and lots of shapes at moderate cost.

You might also want to investigate trim routers for embelishment or as a "live cutter".   Cue makers use live cutters a lot.



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Ed Weber
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Re: Using a Plane
Reply #4 - Nov 20th, 2016 at 12:21pm
 
This Topic was moved here from Tool Talk by Ed Weber.
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Ed Weber
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Re: Using a Plane
Reply #5 - Nov 20th, 2016 at 12:34pm
 
Mike Turner wrote on Nov 20th, 2016 at 9:39am:
As far as planes go I know very little as there are so many kinds.I dont really want a really expensive one ..just one to remove material and have a good finish.


IMO the best, most useful plane to start out with is a small block plane.
As you said very well in your post, "there are so many kinds", that's really an understatement.
I don't know your budget or hand tool skill level (learning curve) but to start with, this is what I would recommend, or at least something similar.
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Re: Using a Plane
Reply #6 - Nov 20th, 2016 at 5:28pm
 
Mike, I just watched the video you linked to and have to say I don't recommend this method.
While the physics make sense, the tool is not made for this, period.
The blade is not made to be used in a power tool setting, (not the proper steel). While it may be less likely to get a catch as the operator mentions, it is possible if the blade is set incorrectly (like there's a correct way to use a plane incorrectly Roll Eyes
The sole of the plane shouldn't touch anything other than wood, (they are not made of very hard steel) certainly not to be used on a hardened steel tool rest.
IMO
This is just a quick & dirty shortcut and shows little respect for the tools.
If you need to remove a "bend" from a piece of turning stock, either mill it before hand or turn it true with the appropriate lathe tools.

As someone once said, "I can open up a can of paint with a chisel, but it doesn't do either one any good"
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Mike Turner
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Re: Using a Plane
Reply #7 - Nov 20th, 2016 at 6:09pm
 
I got ya Ed. On the piece I had mentioned with a bow.. it was actually a large branch which was fairly straight.I bored a 7/8" hole from end to end.I put it away...for a while and went back to and turned it ,, roughed it round...It had a bend in it....Usually they dry pretty straight after boring if they are green(Usually I use dry lumber milled to size)I want to just remove some stock to shape it and make it less thick....A lot of makers esp ones with minimal amount of tools make flutes from branches...Normally I do plan my pieces to size before starting...Thanks!!!

**This one might have bent after boring...I would use a plane with this one in a vise.
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« Last Edit: Nov 20th, 2016 at 6:28pm by Mike Turner »  
 
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Ken Vaughan
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Re: Using a Plane
Reply #8 - Dec 2nd, 2016 at 2:19pm
 

I did stumble onto a plane designed to operate under power on a lathe.

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I found it interesting that the cutting blade and assembly is the same as that traditionally used on many metal spokeshaves. 

Used to make tapered pieces such as chair spindles for windsor or latter back chairs, chair legs.   Might even work for flute production.

Very British!!


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