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Using Detail/Spindle Detail Gouge (Read 1,054 times)
 
Don Stephan
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Using Detail/Spindle Detail Gouge
Nov 27th, 2016 at 6:50pm
 
In the hands of some turners, a detail or spindle detail gouge is an extremely versatile and useful tool, not so much for me.

I've watched a number of videos showing how to use these tools, and I understand the complex handle movement needed to roll beads.  But I don't know which part of the cutting edge I should be using (the very tip, just off the tip . . .), and whether the particular part of the cutting edge used should start perpendicular to the lathe axis or angled.

Yes, sounds like boring technical details, but simply watching different turners a hundred times demonstrating how it's done hasn't helped.

If an explanation of the differences between a spindle gouge and a spindle detail gouge would help, toss that in as well. Smiley
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Ed Weber
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Re: Using Detail/Spindle Detail Gouge
Reply #1 - Nov 27th, 2016 at 9:26pm
 
May I ask, do you have the same issue with "standard" spindle gouges or just the detail (shallow flute) gouges?
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Mike Mills
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Re: Using Detail/Spindle Detail Gouge
Reply #2 - Nov 28th, 2016 at 4:19pm
 
The following link (about mid page) shows the flute of a spindle gouge and under it a detail spindle gouge.  A detail spindle gouge has less material removed. 
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Doug Thompson did list the data on his site but I can not locate it if it is still there.  Something like spindle gouge - 50%, detail spindle gouge - 35%, shallow detail gouge 20% (this may not be completely accurate).
With most spindle work I use near the very tip of a detail gouge....but then again I roll my beads with a skew.
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Don Stephan
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Re: Using Detail/Spindle Detail Gouge
Reply #3 - Nov 28th, 2016 at 8:08pm
 
Other than the  comparative picture on Doug Thompson's web site, I don't know how to compare and contrast a spindle gouge and a spindle detail gouge.  I don't know which should work better for turning beads and coves.  I'm guessing mine are spindle gouges, as the flute is fairly deep.
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Tony Rozendaal
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Re: Using Detail/Spindle Detail Gouge
Reply #4 - Nov 29th, 2016 at 8:09am
 
I don't know if this is helpful or not, but I have a Thompson 1/4-inch spindle gouge and a Thompson 3/8-inch detail gouge.  I use the spindle gouge for stock removal and gradual (longer) shapes, and the detail gouge for smaller shapes and beads.

I use the same sharpening setup for both gouges. For the spindle gouge, it took me some time when I first got it to develop the shape on the end to where it is swept back enough to be useful.

For coves, it just depends on how small the cove is as to which one I use.

In my opinion, the Thompson spindle gouge is a little tricky and unforgiving to use (which could be the grind I have on it) - I am constantly being reminded that if I don't roll the gouge over far enough, set the bevel at the angle I want to enter the wood and start my cut at the center line, it will skate on me. I still like it though, there's nothing quite like it for stock removal and it holds an edge forever. The more I use it, the more natural it becomes to use it correctly.
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Re: Using Detail/Spindle Detail Gouge
Reply #5 - Nov 29th, 2016 at 10:32am
 
Tony Rozendaal wrote on Nov 29th, 2016 at 8:09am:
I am constantly being reminded that if I don't roll the gouge over far enough, set the bevel at the angle I want to enter the wood and start my cut at the center line, it will skate on me.


That goes for most any spindle gouge.
If the cutting edge is not supported, it will be pushed back and you get the "skating' effect.

This is basically how I cut these. To be honest, it's more of a "feel" than anything, Having to dissect your movements into step be step directions is not easy, I may forget (overlook) something.
Every cut is a downhill cut

For beads you should start with the flute at 12:00 straight up. Ride the bevel on the spindle and raise the handle until the tip starts to cut. Once the tool is engaged into the wood, you can begin to roll the tool in the direction you want to cut (left or right) to make one side of a bead.
When rolling the handle you will need the (simultaneously) raise it as well, this will keep the tip engaged in the cut as you move from the top of the bead to the bottom. Repeat the process, always starting the same way at the top (don't try to pick up the cut by starting in the middle) until the bead is shaped the way you want.

For coves you need to start with the flute vertical, facing  3:00 or 9:00 depending on which side of the cove you're cutting. Align the bevel on the gouge with the direction you want to cut. Next you need to establish the start of the cut by engaging the tip. This gives the tool support behind the cutting edge to avoid the "skate".
(for practice you can make a small start cut with a thin parting tool)
Once the tip is engaged in the wood, you can start to (simultaneously) rotate the handle as you push or "sweep" the cutting edge through the arch of the cut, When you get to the bottom of the cove the flute should straight up at 12:00. Repeat the process, always starting the same way at the top (don't try to pick up the cut by starting in the middle) until the cove is shaped the way you want.

Once you get more comfortable you may be able to pick up a cut mid-way through, just remember to make sure the cutting edge is supported (rub the bevel) before you start your cut.

I will mention that some people have difficulty making both sides of their coves and beads even or uniform. One side is usually more difficult or at least uncomfortable to make, since most people are predominantly left or right handed. I usually switch hands for rolling the left or right because it's more comfortable to me. It also keeps me out of the line of fire and I don't have a need to use short handled tools to keep from hitting my body.

Hope this helps
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Re: Using Detail/Spindle Detail Gouge
Reply #6 - Nov 29th, 2016 at 10:49pm
 
Ed Weber wrote on Nov 29th, 2016 at 10:32am:
Every cut is a downhill cut

For beads you should start with the flute at 12:00 straight up. Ride the bevel on the spindle and raise the handle until the tip starts to cut. Once the tool is engaged into the wood, you can begin to roll the tool in the direction you want to cut (left or right) to make one side of a bead.
When rolling the handle you will need the (simultaneously) raise it as well, this will keep the tip engaged in the cut as you move from the top of the bead to the bottom. Repeat the process, always starting the same way at the top (don't try to pick up the cut by starting in the middle) until the bead is shaped the way you want.

For coves you need to start with the flute vertical, facing  3:00 or 9:00 depending on which side of the cove you're cutting. Align the bevel on the gouge with the direction you want to cut. Next you need to establish the start of the cut by engaging the tip. This gives the tool support behind the cutting edge to avoid the "skate".
(for practice you can make a small start cut with a thin parting tool)
Once the tip is engaged in the wood, you can start to (simultaneously) rotate the handle as you push or "sweep" the cutting edge through the arch of the cut, When you get to the bottom of the cove the flute should straight up at 12:00. Repeat the process, always starting the same way at the top (don't try to pick up the cut by starting in the middle) until the cove is shaped the way you want.

Very helpful information.  Thumbs Up
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John Grace
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Re: Using Detail/Spindle Detail Gouge
Reply #7 - Dec 1st, 2016 at 11:58am
 
While certainly not the only video available, I've watched this one numerous times...even positioning my tablet directly above my lathe while working.  There are many other similar videos on YouTube that can show this as well as other techniques.  Hope this helps...John

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Re: Using Detail/Spindle Detail Gouge
Reply #8 - Jan 3rd, 2017 at 5:29am
 
I found in this 4 videos very good informations:
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Re: Using Detail/Spindle Detail Gouge
Reply #9 - Jan 3rd, 2017 at 8:21am
 
John Grace wrote on Dec 1st, 2016 at 11:58am:
While certainly not the only video available, I've watched this one numerous times...even positioning my tablet directly above my lathe while working.  There are many other similar videos on YouTube that can show this as well as other techniques.  Hope this helps...John

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This is a great video. Thanks for posting the link...
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