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Glossy finish (Read 1,354 times)
 
Vic sinai
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Re: Glossy finish
Reply #30 - Mar 2nd, 2017 at 7:37pm
 
Also will try Mylands.  Thx for the suggestion
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Don Stephan
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Re: Glossy finish
Reply #31 - Mar 2nd, 2017 at 7:50pm
 
Friction polish, both store bought and self-mixed, will build much more quickly if you can apply on the lathe.  The resulting finish is not as durable however as the products mentioned above., so it may be more suitable to items that will be admired on a shelf or used very occasionally.  Friction polishes are fun to use!
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Don Stephan
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Re: Glossy finish
Reply #32 - Mar 2nd, 2017 at 7:52pm
 
Sorry Ed, I had no idea products like P&L 38 were still legal in La La land.  The regular distributor here in Cincinnati often has painters in Louisville KY come up and buy all the available quarts of the product, saying they can't get in there.
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chris lawrence
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Re: Glossy finish
Reply #33 - Mar 2nd, 2017 at 8:48pm
 
Vic sinai wrote on Mar 2nd, 2017 at 7:37pm:
Also will try Mylands. Thx for the suggestion

The key is multiple light coats with a minute of spinning between to dry it.  I normally do 3 or 4 coats at a low speed with light pressure.  Then a couple coats at a higher speed with firm pressure.  The last coat I do a side to side motion with firm pressure for a couple minutes.  The heat that it generates makes it really shine.  I have done multiple pepper mills and tap handles with it and have not had it wear off yet.
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Ed Weber
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Re: Glossy finish
Reply #34 - Mar 2nd, 2017 at 9:19pm
 
Don Stephan wrote on Mar 2nd, 2017 at 7:52pm:
La La land


Smiley
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Ray Stubbs
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Re: Glossy finish
Reply #35 - Jun 24th, 2017 at 11:50am
 
I've read this whole blog, and nowhere did see where anyone said anything about using sanding sealer before applying WOP. I think what's happening is the wood is soaking up the WOP for the first 6 to 8 coats. My experience has been to apply a minimum of 2 coats of sanding sealer, I use DEFT, with sanding after each coat, before applying the WOP.
Using this process, I put 4 to 6 coats of WOP for a nice gloss finish.
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Ed Weber
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Re: Glossy finish
Reply #36 - Jun 25th, 2017 at 10:50am
 
Ray Stubbs wrote on Jun 24th, 2017 at 11:50am:
I've read this whole blog, and nowhere did see where anyone said anything about using sanding sealer before applying WOP. I think what's happening is the wood is soaking up the WOP for the first 6 to 8 coats.


While I understand your point, IMO there's more to it.
To achieve a "glossy finish you either need to,
1. Use a product designed to produce a glossy finish
or
2. Use a product that can achieve a glossy finish by buffing/polishing.
Each product has it's own method of getting to the final 'glossy' result.
In the majority of cases, you do not need to use sanding sealer, but as mentioned it can help to lessen the amount of coats it takes in order to build the top-coat.

Typically, most WOP's are a thinned down version of standard polyurethane. It's designed to be easier applied without leaving application marks and dry more quickly. On the down side, it also takes many more coats (3-4 times) to build a thick enough film to get to the glossy result the OP is looking for.

Today, most polyurethanes can be wiped on without thinning and have very good self leveling qualities. Depending on your personal preferences there is no need, other than convenience, to buy a wipe on product. If you want/need a thinned version it's simple enough to thin it yourself with the appropriate solvent/thinner. Read the label to determine what product to thin your polyurethane/varnish with.
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Don Stephan
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Re: Glossy finish
Reply #37 - Jun 25th, 2017 at 10:54am
 
Kudos for adding to the thread a good point, Ray.  I don't use sanding sealer because I try to minimize the number of cans of product that can gel before empty, and because I don't think it would dramatically reduce from 5-7 the number of coats I have to rub on to achieve a semi gloss finish.  On that sassafras bowl sanding sealer might have been helpful, but not significantly on maple, oak, ash, walnut, cherry, bradford pear, or holly.  I never achieve a filled pore finish on oak and ash with 5-7 coats, but I don't think two coats of sanding sealer would fill those open grain woods either.
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