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straight,long staves (Read 397 times)
 
Edgar Sims
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peoria, Arizona, USA
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straight,long staves
Mar 15th, 2017 at 5:53pm
 
Hi,
I got several inserts for coffee cups that I would like to turn shells for. I dont have large enough pieces of wood to turn from solid material. Plus I would like to use up some of the scraps I have. I would like to mill segmented staves from these scraps. I have a good and accurate table saw and an old Makita chop saw. In reading about segmented milling many cut the blanks on a RAS but Im not sure mine is accurate enough for me to do that. My Uni-saw is an older right tilt but its accurate and I have several good blades. My question is dose anyone seen or know of a jig for ripping longer, 9, staves? Ive looked at some of the wedgies jigs, and think I could probable make one of those for longer staves, as all I saw were for short pieces, but not real sure.  One way I thought of is to mill the material into rectangles with the grain running the correct way and then tilt the saw the correct angle and cut one side then flip the material and cut the other side. This will require using one of a few ways that I know of getting the staves the correct width. Any thought or suggestions appreciated.
Ed Sims
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Ed Weber
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Wilton, California, USA
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Re: straight,long staves
Reply #1 - Mar 15th, 2017 at 6:45pm
 
Edgar Sims wrote on Mar 15th, 2017 at 5:53pm:
many cut the blanks on a RAS


People with names like Lefty and Lucky  Roll Eyes

Edgar Sims wrote on Mar 15th, 2017 at 5:53pm:
One way I thought of is to mill the material into rectangles with the grain running the correct way and then tilt the saw the correct angle and cut one side then flip the material and cut the other side.

IMO
Using a tablesaw as you suggest is the best way to go most of the time.
You don't necessarily need a sled, but I prefer one.
A ripping blade, if you have one or at least a combination blade.
Set the bevel on the saw to the angle you want.
The sled doesn't need to be anything fancy, a piece of plywood with a couple of toggle clamps and a stop-block.
Make a cut with just the sled to get your reference edge, then you can cut one side on all the pieces, move the stop and cut the remaining side.
If you have a right tilt saw, make sure you put the sled on the left of the blade.
The pice is showing a compound stave but the setup is the same.

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Guy Bratt
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Re: straight,long staves
Reply #2 - Mar 16th, 2017 at 10:50pm
 
Here's another perspective. A good example of a poor set up. I don't do this anymore. DANGER! I trapped my cut off between my stop block and the tilted blade. With the cut off clamped down I got lucky. MAKE your set up so the stave falls free. This was also a compound miter set up.
I like to use a digital "Tilt Box" to set my blade angle.
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Ed Weber
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Re: straight,long staves
Reply #3 - Mar 17th, 2017 at 9:36am
 
Guy Bratt wrote on Mar 16th, 2017 at 10:50pm:
DANGER! I trapped my cut off between my stop block and the tilted blade.  With the cut off clamped down I got lucky. MAKE your set up so the stave falls free.


It doesn't matter which piece (the cut or the drop) falls free.
You want to be sure that which ever piece you clamp is secure.
Tilt the blade away from your sled.
Don't tilt the blade toward the fence whether cutting freehand or with a sled. This can cause binding and kick-back.

As you can see in the photos.
In my setup, the blade is tilted away from the sled and the stave is held securely with no potential for binding.
On Guy's sled the blade is tilted in, toward the piece and the holding fixture. If Guy simply moves the hold down to the opposite side of the blade, all will be fine.

Thanks for posting Guy, I'm sure many people have done the same thing.

Straight staves can also be made using a router table and even a jointer
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Edgar Sims
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peoria, Arizona, USA
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Re: straight,long staves
Reply #4 - Mar 18th, 2017 at 7:38pm
 
Thanks, Ed & Guy
I'm going to make a sled similar to what Ed pictured. I'm familar with the perils of drop-offs not having sufficient clearance and flying back. In order to make the staves the same size do you mill the stock to the same width before cutting the wedge shape? Also, do you need a separate sled for each angle (different segments to make the circle). I'm going to try and read some descriptions before I try this. Looks like there is quite a bit of information out there. Thanks, again.
Ed Sims
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« Last Edit: Mar 19th, 2017 at 10:57am by Edgar Sims »  
 
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Ed Weber
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Re: straight,long staves
Reply #5 - Mar 19th, 2017 at 1:20pm
 
I mill the stock to the same width before cutting the stave but as long as you have one good side to reference against the stop-block it's not necessary.
You don't need to have a separate sled for each angle.
An easy way to do this is to mount your stop block temporarily. I screw mine with the screws coming up from the bottom.
After I cut one side, I unscrew and move the stop over. If you want to, you can use a spacer block to move the piece over so you don't have to unscrew and remount the block. You can also use one of the drop-off pieces (if you milled them) to provide the proper angle for the stop-block. I either use double-stick tape or CA glue to hole it in place.
The underside of my sleds look like Swiss cheese after a while from mounting and remounting various guides, fixtures, blocks, clamps and so on.
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