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steb centers (Read 677 times)
 
Ed Weber
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Re: steb centers
Reply #15 - May 22nd, 2017 at 9:02am
 
Mike Mills wrote on May 17th, 2017 at 2:22pm:
What I use mine for is small dry spindles under 2" diameter and small dry face work under about 7".  For the face work I mean like a small platter, saucer, or other thin item" where you may have a limited about of wood to be removed; this could also include small winged bowls (Clewes style).

You can call it whatever you want and hold it however you want, it wasn't the language that confused me.
From your description, I don't understand why or how (I can only guess in conjunction with the tailstock) you would use a drive center for "small platter, saucer, or other thin item"
I don't understand this approach to work holding.

Mike Mills wrote on May 22nd, 2017 at 7:55am:
My impression is they were made to provide a tenacious grip with minimal damage to the wood.

That part is true, but the other half of the equation is that in the event of a catch, they are "designed" to work as a slip-clutch mechanism. This means providing an outlet for the turning force so that, primarily the operator and secondarily the piece, suffer little or no damage.

In  the event of a catch with a traditional 4-prong drive center, you will usually have one of two things happen.
1. The tool will dig in further before it eventually kicks the tool out and creates a larger damaged area, since the drive continues to turn the spindle.
2. The tool stops the spindle entirely, leaving only one place for the turning force to be released, splitting the spindle.
A steb center eliminates both of those potential safety hazards.
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Brad Barnhart
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Sawdust Haven Woodworking

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Harbor Freight 12" x 33 5/8"
67" home built lathe
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16" Craftsman Scroll saw
12"DeWalt Radial arm saw
8" Craftsman Tablesaw
Re: steb centers
Reply #16 - May 22nd, 2017 at 9:19pm
 
thanks for all the input, spite the confusion. Mr. Ken, I appreciate the info, but, I own 5 scroll saws, & use them all but one. And it's the first one I completely wore out.

As I said, I'd like to learn more on the lathe to add some wow! to some of my scroll projects. Most of the projects I do are Native American, or centered around it. I have several ideas, it's just a matter of perfecting the lathe to my satisfaction in order to pursue the projects. If you care to take a look at my work, my fb page is Sawdust Haven. Again, I appreciate all your input. I learned alot from it. Brad.
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Grant Wilkinson
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Re: steb centers
Reply #17 - May 23rd, 2017 at 8:26am
 
If you look at Lyle Jamieson videos on youtube, you will see that he starts all of his bowls between centers using a Steb in the headstock. This way, he can change the centers around until the blank is balanced, and then move the centers marginally while turning it to get the best grain and feature orientation.
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Grant Wilkinson
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Ed Weber
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Re: steb centers
Reply #18 - May 23rd, 2017 at 8:46am
 
Grant, thank you for that explanation.
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I don't use that method, personally I start with my blanks a bit more refined than the one shown in the video.
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« Last Edit: May 23rd, 2017 at 9:00am by Ed Weber »  
 
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Grant Wilkinson
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Re: steb centers
Reply #19 - May 23rd, 2017 at 11:44am
 
Ed: that's one of the videos that I was thinking of. In that one, Lyle is using a prong center, but the same idea holds using a steb.

As an aside, like you, I generally start with a blank a bit more refined. I tend to cut them round on my bandsaw first. I still get heavy spots, though, and Lyle's process works well. I've also learned from Lyle's method that I can get better grain symmetry than I did when I stuck a face plate on the blank from the start.
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Grant Wilkinson
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Arlin Eastman
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Re: steb centers
Reply #20 - May 23rd, 2017 at 1:24pm
 
Brad

Pennstateind has them for a great price and I bought both the 5/8s" and 1" and the one for the tail stock also all less then then $90 and they work fantastic.

If you need a link I will get one for you.
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Ed Weber
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Re: steb centers
Reply #21 - May 23rd, 2017 at 2:00pm
 
Grant Wilkinson wrote on May 23rd, 2017 at 11:44am:
Ed: that's one of the videos that I was thinking of. In that one, Lyle is using a prong center, but the same idea holds using a steb.


You didn't post a link so I provided an example. (took a shot)
I'm well aware of what he is doing in his process with regards to grain alignment but I confess, I didn't get that from Mike's description. (if he's referring to the same thing).

As always, everyone has their own way of doing things. I am only trying to clarify for myself and others that either don't know of a different process or don't understand the explanation of a certain process.
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Brad Barnhart
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Sawdust Haven Woodworking

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St. Francis, Kansas, USA
St. Francis, Kansas
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Harbor Freight 12" x 33 5/8"
67" home built lathe
BM-26 Hawk scroll saw
CW-40 Hitachi Scroll Saw
16" Craftsman Scroll saw
12"DeWalt Radial arm saw
8" Craftsman Tablesaw
Re: steb centers
Reply #22 - May 23rd, 2017 at 2:01pm
 
thank you Arlin
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Mike Mills
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Re: steb centers
Reply #23 - May 23rd, 2017 at 3:11pm
 
I finally realized what was missing.  When I said "and small dry face work under about 7"."  I should have said "to start small dry face work....". 
In a Jimmy Clewes workshop one of the items we turned was a small platter (saucer) of QS sycamore 3/4 thick.  Starting between centers the top was slightly dished out and a tenon formed; then reversed holding the tenon with a chuck and then bottom was formed with a recess; then reversed again to finish the top.  Starting with the steb meant it did not have to be "set" into the wood as the teeth are sharp enough.
I did not make the connection that folks may think the entire project was turned with just a steb.  Sorry 'bout that.

Whether it is purchased for grip or for safety (slippage) is up to the buyer.
Mine are the cheapo PSI but they work fine for me (<$30 on Amazon).
I did check Sorby and PSI but my eyesight leaves much to be desired.  I could only find references to the superior hold/grip in their descriptions.
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I did look at your facebook and that is some mighty fine scroll work.

Alan Stratton posted this video a two days ago where he turned a scroll sawn item.  I know it is not up to what you do but it may give you some ideas.  He also shows a different approach (friction chuck) for starting the item.
Gave me an idea for next Christmas for some in-laws that fish a lot... a coin/key bowl 3/4" thick (1/2" deep) in the shape of a fish.
You can skip the first 2 minutes in this video.
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Ed Weber
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Re: steb centers
Reply #24 - May 23rd, 2017 at 4:10pm
 
Makes perfect sense now.
I also opted for a less expensive brand. I purchased the Woodcraft (Wood River) brand years ago. I wouldn't be without one.
Some of the "features" listed for the Sorby center do not interest me at all and could be considered dangerous. IMO

"Flexible: By varying tail stock pressure, the work piece can be inspected without shutting off the lathe, simply back off the tailstock until the teeth disengage the work piece. This allows the center point to hold the work in place with the lathe still running. Apply heavy pressure with the tailstock and you have a super aggressive drive center that won't slip."

Just because you can doesn't mean it's a good idea. I'll stick to turning off the lathe before I inspect my work.
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« Last Edit: May 23rd, 2017 at 4:12pm by Ed Weber »  
 
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