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Anchorseal clarification (Read 478 times)
 
Bruce Kamp
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Anchorseal clarification
May 21st, 2017 at 12:12pm
 
I have looked through the history discussion on Anchorseal here. My specific question is:
What are the pros and cons of covering a rough turned bowl completely with Anchorseal?
Specifically I am working with burr oak (white oak) at the moment. I have sealed end grain, inside and out, with Anchorseal and placed in a kiln at 80-90 degrees. This seems to make it dry too fast because I get checking. I have also coated the rough cut in Anchorseal, put in a brown paper bag with shavings and place in my garage (Chicago area). I have seen no checking but VERY little MC movement after three months.
My timeline for finishing these has recently been extended into next year. This will allow me to not be rushed in the drying process.
Specifically, if I cover the entire rough cut bowl in Anchorseal will I still get some slow drying? Without checking? Another way of asking the question is "does Anchorseal allow for ANY breathing at all?"
There seems to be very little side grain left on my rough cuts anyway. So, when coating in Anchorseal and trying to avoid covering side grain I end up with very little exposed.
Thanks
Bruce
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Ed Weber
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Re: Anchorseal clarification
Reply #1 - May 21st, 2017 at 3:28pm
 
Bruce, I'm sure you'll get many responses as to how much or how little to use, everyone seems to have their own way of sealing blanks.
i would take a look at Multimedia File Viewing and Clickable Links are available for Registered Members only!!  You need to Login or Register to get the actual information on how much one product or another will let the wood breathe. There are more products than just anchorseal.
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Tony Rozendaal
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Re: Anchorseal clarification
Reply #2 - May 22nd, 2017 at 7:38am
 
Yes, anchorseal does allow breathing, or drying, but it slows it down.

I don't live that far away from you and I personally would not cover 100% with anchorseal AND put it in a paper bag with shavings. IMO, doing so will slow down the drying of the blank too much.

I've had success with white / burr oak sealing the bowl about 75% or so - particularly on the end grain - and putting it in a room with about 100 other bowl blanks and letting it set for two years.

(In fact, I was looking for those particular blanks within the past week and finally found them yesterday. They are the next to go onto the lathe. Smiley )
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« Last Edit: May 22nd, 2017 at 7:40am by Tony Rozendaal »  

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Bruce Kamp
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Re: Anchorseal clarification
Reply #3 - May 22nd, 2017 at 2:55pm
 
Tony,
Have you ever used a kiln to do the drying of the white oak? It seems oak, both red and white, are more difficult to dry, at least in any accelerated fashion.
I have had a couple of successes with it in the kiln but they have been small pieces. Picture of one attached. I fully coated it with AS and left it in the kiln for about four months. Larger ones I have not been so lucky with.
I have all of my other rough turned blanks of this batch fully covered in AS now.
I spoke with UC Coatings and they did say that AS does "breath" but not much. Makes sense.
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Rick Caron
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Re: Anchorseal clarification
Reply #4 - May 22nd, 2017 at 5:15pm
 
On some unturned blanks i have some checking with one coat.  just on end grain.    I do coat the middle a few inches on either side of pith.....   After the blank has been  cut length wise ..
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Grant Wilkinson
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Re: Anchorseal clarification
Reply #5 - May 23rd, 2017 at 8:22am
 
I think that this is another of those questions that will give you 11 answers from 10 turners.  Smiley

FWIW, I was taught that we are using Anchorseal to even out the drying process between the end grain and the side grain. Since the water will leave the end grain more quickly that it will leave the side grain, I coat the end grain only. This slows the drying of the end grain part to roughly equal the drying of the unsealed side grain. If you coat the whole blank, you have slowed everything down equally, so the end grain will still dry more quickly than the side grain.

I put the sealed blanks into paper bags. I do not add shavings, as they are very wet and, to me at least, defeat the purpose. Also, if they are very wet, you can get surface mold on the blank.

As the bag gets damp from the blank giving off water, I replace it with a dry bag. Newspaper works well as a substitute for bags. Keep changing out whatever you use when it gets very damp.

I would guess my climate - Ottawa, ON - is very similar to yours in Chicago. Since I don't do a lot of blanks at one time, I keep them on shelves in my basement. My garage in winter is well below freezing for months, so I don't imagine that blanks would dry very well in those conditions. In the basement, I leave them for somewhere around 8 months. This is based on a wall thickness of an inch or so.

I've followed the same process with oak, ash, maple, birch, cherry, apple and walnut, and some odds and sodds. I'm not saying that I've never had cracking, but I've never had cracking that I could not turn out - touch wood.  Smiley
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Grant Wilkinson
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Tony Rozendaal
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Re: Anchorseal clarification
Reply #6 - May 23rd, 2017 at 12:46pm
 
Bruce Kamp wrote on May 22nd, 2017 at 2:55pm:
Tony,
Have you ever used a kiln to do the drying of the white oak? It seems oak, both red and white, are more difficult to dry, at least in any accelerated fashion.


I don't use a kiln.  A  friend of mine has a kiln, and I think he has a higher failure rate than I do.  My methodology is to fill the pipeline with blanks so that I can finish turn a pretty steady stream of rough-outs that are about 2 years old or so. YMMV  Wink
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Bruce Kamp
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Re: Anchorseal clarification
Reply #7 - May 23rd, 2017 at 8:23pm
 
Thank you all for your input.
A lot of times I am left with very little side grain on my rough turned bowls. I have noticed that when I coat only the end grain of bowls it then leaves very little apace for the moisture to evaporate. I often notice that I end up with quite a range of moisture content over different parts of the bowl during the drying process. I can get next to nothing in the bottom or in an exposed side grain area while still getting 15%-20% on the end grain sides and/or the top of the rim. I often get this without checking occurring. This has happened with walnut, cherry, maple, much of it in the kiln. I do get warping though. The white oak is a whole different animal.
This would seem to indicate that the drying is not occurring evenly. Which is ok, i guess, if I do not get checking.
I don't expect a "best" answer. I just was curious about what others do and their experience.
Thank you again everyone for your response.
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robert baccus
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Re: Anchorseal clarification
Reply #8 - May 24th, 2017 at 10:14pm
 
For 25 years I have been using endseal on the entire roughed out piece.  One exception is vases/urns.  I only do the outside and lips.  On very hard strong woods I will add a second coat on lips, edges,  endgrain and suspect areas.  The harder and stronger a wood is the more it will pull and crack and check and should be allowed for.  I may lose 5% of my roughouts if I don't check often enough.  Be brave and good luck!
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Breck Whitworth
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Re: Anchorseal clarification
Reply #9 - May 25th, 2017 at 12:04am
 
I am primarily a bowl man and over the years the method I have learned to protect rough turned bowls works the best. Which means I have less fatal cracks with my method than all the other ways I have tried. I coat the entire rough turned bowl inside and out, then cover the bowl with brown packing paper leaving the inside of the bowl open to air movement covering just the rim. This for only a month or so because a bowl looses the majority of it's water in the first month. I use these techniques to slow down the initial water loss. after a month or so I remove the brown paper and place it up on a shelf for the rest of the drying time. If I use my drying kilns I only place them in a kiln after the paper is removed. I don't use a kiln I stack them and allow them to air dry.
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Jeff Vanden Boogart
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Re: Anchorseal clarification
Reply #10 - May 26th, 2017 at 8:54am
 
I'm with Breck on coating the whole bowl, or nearly so.  Looking at your average bowl, probably 90% of the surface has exposed end grain.
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John Cepko
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Re: Anchorseal clarification
Reply #11 - May 26th, 2017 at 7:57pm
 
I coat the end grain with AS only on blanks I am not going to turn in a day or so of cutting.
Then after rough turning, I coat the whole thing.
Then sit on a shelf until weight loss stops, or I get around to it.
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