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Drowning in Danish Oil (Read 339 times)
 
Bill Neff
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Drowning in Danish Oil
Jun 2nd, 2017 at 8:02pm
 
I'm working on finishing 2 bowls, one maple and the other birch.  They are inhaling and absorbing DO like I've never seen.   I've put 11 coats on each and haven't had to wipe any off yet.  I had done one other birch bowl that after 10 coats it stopped absorbing the finish.   Every other bowl I've ever done has never drank the finish like these bowls.  I've put a pint of finish on them.

Anyone ever had this issue?
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« Last Edit: Jun 2nd, 2017 at 8:02pm by Bill Neff »  

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Ed Weber
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Re: Drowning in Danish Oil
Reply #1 - Jun 2nd, 2017 at 8:45pm
 
Some turners actually buy it by the drum and submerge the entire piece (sometimes overnight) until it can't absorb anymore.
It sounds like you may be reaching that point.
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Don Stephan
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Re: Drowning in Danish Oil
Reply #2 - Jun 3rd, 2017 at 7:40am
 
Are you using a commercial or a self-mixed danish oil?  Finishing journalists regularly question the percentage of resin in commercial products.  The least expensive ingredient is mineral spirits, which does nothing to seal the wood.

A common self-mixed formula is equal parts mineral spirits (MS), boiled linseed oil (BLO) and varnish.  There are two or three basic types of varnish, I use an alkyd, Pratt & Lambert 38 gloss, after reading about the types of varnishes in several books and magazine articles.  In one of his books, Jeff Jewitt observed that the primary contribution of BLO in danish oil is to warm up the wood, and found he could achieve that result with a formula of 1/9th BLO and 4/9ths MS and varnish.  BLO is a softer resin and does not produce much sheen, so my expectation is that a smaller concentration of BLO in danish oil can result in a harder, shinier finish.

Now I use a wiping varnish consisting of equal parts MS and P&L 38 gloss, but when I was using a danish oil mixed from equal parts MS, BLO, and P&L 38, I found the second application and occasionally the 3rd would occasionally still rapidly soak into end grain, but by the 4th application was starting to build a "close to the wood" finish.  After 6 or 7 applications, the result was what I considered to be a satin finish.

I will make the first application late afternoon and allow to cure overnight.  If the 2nd application the next morning still soaks in I'll wait and make the 3rd application that evening, otherwise I make applications around 9 AM, 1 PM, and 6 PM until getting an acceptable final look.
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Rick Caron
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Re: Drowning in Danish Oil
Reply #3 - Jun 3rd, 2017 at 12:52pm
 
1/9th BLO and 4/9ths MS and varnish
I use to use 1/3   1/3    1/3
works good for a first soaking coat. I put a cup of this in the bowl using latex gloves slather the bowl inside and out For 10 minutes  then paper towel dry,  let sit 1 day.     I found if i use  the 1/3 mix for the second coat it takes days to dry, The 1/3 BLO is now not soaking in.
I have switched  to the 1/9 BLO,  4/9 mineral spirits, varnish.
Dries quicker...     Can do multiple coats in a day.
The store bought Danish Oil,  or  Formby's     is mostly mineral spirits.
I had the same problem with the bowl  taking  12+ coats to build a satin shine.         Smiley
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Bill Neff
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Re: Drowning in Danish Oil
Reply #4 - Jun 4th, 2017 at 11:51am
 
I was using Watco Danish Oil.  I think I finally hit the saturation point just after posting this.  The next coat just sat there so it got wiped.   On a previous couple of bowls I made my own solution of 2 parts Mahoney's Walnut Oil, 2 parts Minwax gloss ureathane and 1 part mineral spirits.  On that birch bowl it pulled in 13 coats before I quit.
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Don Stephan
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Re: Drowning in Danish Oil
Reply #5 - Jun 4th, 2017 at 2:16pm
 
This discussion raises for me an interesting question.

Using my self-mixed equal thirds of BLO, varnish and MS, I would wipe on several wet coats one right after another over several minutes, then wipe dry and let cure several hours or overnight before the next application.  While others are allowing the mix to soak in for a longer period of time.

My understanding of BLO and varnish are that they require a chemical reaction with oxygen in the air to cure.  If a piece of wood is submerged in danish oil for a period of time, will the mix penetrate further into the wood than my several minute wipe-on?  And if so, is a longer period of time needed for oxygen to react with that deeper penetrated mix, or even can oxygen ever reach that far into the wood?  If not, are there long term implications for the final surface finish?
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Re: Drowning in Danish Oil
Reply #6 - Jun 5th, 2017 at 8:46am
 
One of the benefits of total submersion is that you get to the total saturation stage in one step, without the need to apply multiple coats.
On a turned object where almost all of the piece have some portion of end grain, certain areas will draw in large quantities of finish before they reach saturation. While repeatedly applying coats, you can see the finish being absorbed into the wood. The finish is drawn into the pores by capillary action. When totally submerged, the wood will draw in all that in can in one step.
As for the drying.
Yes it will take longer but all of the finish will dry. The outside film that is exposed to the atmosphere (oxygen) will dry first. This in turn starts a cross linking reaction so that all of the finish, regardless how deep will eventually polymerize or cure.
The total cure time takes longer but doesn't require any additional work
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Don Stephan
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Re: Drowning in Danish Oil
Reply #7 - Jun 5th, 2017 at 7:56pm
 
Never knew that about the curing process, I always expected continued oxygen molecules needed as part of the curing.  But of course once a can of varnish starts to gel it continues willy nilly or helter skelter even if the can is not opened again.  That suggests exposure to some oxygen needed to start the curing, but not to continue.
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Ed Weber
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Re: Drowning in Danish Oil
Reply #8 - Jun 5th, 2017 at 9:42pm
 
Once the cross-linking polymerization starts, it will continue.
I recently had a tube (caulking gun style) of liquid nails with a bad plunger seal, the entire tube was solid.
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