Woodturner's Resource
Woodturner's Resource  
  Featured Artist    Websites   Support Wr
Tutorials, Projects & Tips   Event Calendar   Tool and Book Store
  Home Page Forum HelpSearch Map TPT Resources LoginRegister
 
Page Index Toggle Pages: 1
Send Topic Print
Starving a glue joint (Read 194 times)
 
Tom Coghill
WR Addict
*****
Offline


Turning, when I am done
with my chores.

Posts: 1,044

Anchorage, Alaska, USA
Anchorage
Alaska
USA

Gender: male

Oneway 2436, 3 HP 220V
Starving a glue joint
Jun 5th, 2017 at 4:13pm
 
I figure this is the right area for this question. If not, please move it accordingly.

I do not do segmented turnings, however there are times when I do make glue joints that I want to have integrity. I hear that one can "starve" a joint by over-clamping, essentially squeezing out so much of the glue that it no longer makes a good joint. I have even had this happen to me. What I do as a rule, I apply glue to BOTH sides of the joint, let it stand about 3-5 minutes, then clamp the project. This seems ample time to allow the glue to work into the pores of the wood.

Do others have better methods in forming glued joints?? Huh
Back to top
  
 
IP Logged
 
Register To Remove Ads
Ed Weber
WR Global Moderator
WR Patron
*****
Online



Posts: 4,695

Wilton, California, USA
Wilton
California
USA

Gender: male

JET 1642
Grizzly G0584
Re: Starving a glue joint
Reply #1 - Jun 5th, 2017 at 5:40pm
 
I have never starved a joint that I'm aware of, at least not to the point of failure.
The procedure your performing is called a sizing coat. Multimedia File Viewing and Clickable Links are available for Registered Members only!!  You need to Login or Register

In segmenting, most joints are simple butt joints, regardless of grain direction.
probably the most common is end-grain to end-grain butt joints for the basic brick-lay pattern.
As you mentioned ALWAYS spread glue on both surfaces so that it can be absorbed into the pores evenly across the entire surface.
In my experience, the main reason for "starved joints is excessive clamping pressure followed by improper glue application.
If you have proper fitting joints, there is no need for excess pressure when clamping, no white knuckles when tightening the clamps. No extra amount of pressure is going to make a better connection at the joint. All that's required is enough pressure so that the glue surfaces meet evenly with minimal squeeze out. (always perform a dry fit prior to gluing)
Glue should be applied EVENLY to both surfaces of the joint. This means using a brush, spreader or brayer, NOT your finger.
Back to top
  
 
IP Logged
 
Arlin Eastman
Active Member
***
Online


Born in the USA

Posts: 204

Council Bluffs, Iowa, USA
Council Bluffs
Iowa
USA

Gender: male

PM3520B
Re: Starving a glue joint
Reply #2 - Jun 6th, 2017 at 4:18pm
 
Tom

When I do glue ups I do not add to much pressure, just enough to keep everything aligned and will not move around.   After I did this I never had one break apart again.
Back to top
  

It is always the right time; To do the right thing
 
IP Logged
 
Page Index Toggle Pages: 1
Send Topic Print