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OB Shine Juice (Read 236 times)
 
Ray Stubbs
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OB Shine Juice
Jul 19th, 2017 at 3:39pm
 
Has anyone used this product? I saw a guy mix BLO, Bullseye shellac and denatured alcohol all equal parts to get a nice finish on a piece.
I wondered if anyone has used it and how durable the finish was after a period of time.
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Ed Weber
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Re: OB Shine Juice
Reply #1 - Jul 19th, 2017 at 4:31pm
 
Shine juice is just homemade friction polish (without the wax) usually).
As far as durability goes, it's about the same as shellac, it really depends on how many coats you apply to build the finish.
Linseed oil and shellac have been used for centuries, more typically called French polish.
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Louie Powell
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Re: OB Shine Juice
Reply #2 - Jul 19th, 2017 at 5:24pm
 
There are many similar formulas - they common theme is equal quantities of some kind of finish (shellac, lacquer, etc), the recommended thinner for that finish, and an oil (BLO, walnut oil, or Tung oil).

I use a friction polish formula that calls for equal quantities of lacquer, lacquer thinner, and pure Tung oil (not Tung Oil Finish - that's a varnish). It's not as shiny as 'shine juice', but I think substituting lacquer for shellac produces a more durable finish.

I've also seen a friction polish made by mixing equal parts of shellac, DNA, and Howard's Feed'n Wax (a commercial oil/wax blend) that produces a very shiny finish.

I also use a wiping varnish made from a Russ Fairchild formula - equal parts of a good quality spar varnish (I use McCloskey's Man-o-War), turpentine, and Tung oil.
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« Last Edit: Jul 19th, 2017 at 5:24pm by Louie Powell »  

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Ray Stubbs
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Re: OB Shine Juice
Reply #3 - Jul 19th, 2017 at 7:41pm
 
Ed and Louis I do appreciate you guys enlightening me on finishing processes. I'm fairly new at this process of turning.
My experience has been to use WOP on everything I've turned.
Thanks again for the information.
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Don Stephan
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Re: OB Shine Juice
Reply #4 - Jul 19th, 2017 at 8:02pm
 
Ed

Sometimes there can be a benefit from first describing a bowl function (display, mixing salad, eating cereal, holding business cards, et cetera, and then looking at suitable finishes.

Some finishes are softer and thus may wear on a bowl used regularly.  I've always read that a wax coating is liable to develop water spots, but that may or may not apply to all waxes and application methods.

Another consideration may be ease of application.  Friction polish goes on quickly and relatively easily.  The wiping varnish I use requires about 5-7 hand rubbed coats over several days to build to a satin or semigloss, but is extremely durable when cured - I've been using my red oak cereal bowl every morning for almost 20 months now.  The sheen has reduced, but what a wonderful way to start the day.
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Ed Weber
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Re: OB Shine Juice
Reply #5 - Jul 19th, 2017 at 8:24pm
 
Thanks for keeping me straight Don, I wasn't quite prepared to debate the merits of shellac VS. whatever.
Don Stephan wrote on Jul 19th, 2017 at 8:02pm:
Friction polish goes on quickly and relatively easily.

You get what you pay for, they come off quick and easy too  Grin

I don't use friction polish on turned item anymore, lack of durability on frequently handled pieces.
I do apply French polish as a technique but this is another story.
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Don Stephan
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Re: OB Shine Juice
Reply #6 - Jul 20th, 2017 at 7:42am
 
Oops, my reply was intended to be addressed to the original poster, Ray  Sorry for the confusion.  Got home late again from work and trying too quickly to catch up.
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Ray Stubbs
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Re: OB Shine Juice
Reply #7 - Jul 20th, 2017 at 9:44am
 
Don your first sentence says it all. Determine the use before determining the type of finish to use. And the turner may not know what the end use will be especially if the bowl will be sold.
I was just trying to decide if I want to change my finishing products or stick  with WOP which has served me well so far.
Could you share the wiping varnish brand you use.
Thanks Ray
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Don Stephan
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Re: OB Shine Juice
Reply #8 - Jul 20th, 2017 at 7:50pm
 
After reading several magazine and on-line articles from recognized finishing experts I decided to try a wiping varnish.  After studying what I could find on the three types of varnish I decided I wanted to try an alkyd varnish.  I saw a couple very positive reviews of Pratt & Lambert 38 and that's what I've been using for a couple years now, in gloss.  I mix 50-50 with a good grade of mineral spirits, wipe on all surfaces with a rag, then wipe dry with clean paper towels and allow to dry on nail boards.  For the first application I often wipe on the outside, the inside, then repeat several times to try to saturate the wood before wiping dry.  For the second application I will repeat like the first if the finish is again soaking in quickly.

I'll make the first application before going home in the evening, so it has 13 or 14 hours to start curing.  I'll make the second application the next morning and the third that evening.  If there are any rough areas I'll go over those areas several times with a gray nylon pad.  The third day I'll make applications at around 9:30, 1:30, and 6.  This total of six applications usually has yielded what I would call a semi-gloss sheen and I stop.  After a few more days on nail boards the bowls are ready for sale, though the finish likely isn't fully cured for at least a couple weeks after the last application.

For about the last year I've been sanding through to 800 grit on all surfaces, rather than just 320, to bring out more of the figure and character of the wood.  No adhesion problems have been encountered.

Wiping takes more time than an aerosol or friction finish, but I don't want to keep multiple partially used cans of finish on hand as many go bad after a while. 

This finish is extremely durable - my red oak cereal bowl now has over 19 months of daily washings with no sign of water damage.  Such durability isn't needed on say a live edge display bowl that will likely never be used, but it looks just as good as an easier finish.

You might consider doing any and all experimenting on "failed" bowls (cracks, . . .) or even scrap pieces of board before trying a new finish on a nice turning.

Hope this helps.
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Ray Stubbs
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Re: OB Shine Juice
Reply #9 - Jul 21st, 2017 at 7:21pm
 
Don thanks for the detailed process. I'll have to try this and see what happens.
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