Woodturner's Resource
Woodturner's Resource  
  • Featured Artist    • Websites   Support Wr
Tutorials, Projects & Tips   • Event Calendar   • Tool and Book Store
  Home Page Forum HelpSearch Map TPT Resources LoginRegister
 
Page Index Toggle Pages: 1
Send Topic Print
recipe for finish (Read 86 times)
 
Rick Caron
Active Member
WR Supporter
***
Offline


So many logs, so little
time!

Posts: 234

Greer, South Carolina, USA
Greer
South Carolina
USA

Gender: male
recipe for finish
Sep 10th, 2017 at 9:23am
 
I've using  half mineral spirits-half spar varnish,   And just a little bit of BLO to bring the grain out.  Works good  except does turn the wood  darker.
What would be the recipe for  shellac, DNA,  BLO,  or should i leave out the BLO.      Tried this  years ago but it dried so fast   didn't have time to level out.   Maybe i had the  proportions wrong.     If i leave out the BLO  will the grain still pop?
Trying to get away from having the finish  darkening  the wood.
Back to top
  
 
IP Logged
 
Register To Remove Ads
Don Stephan
WR Addict
*****
Offline


WR Rocks!

Posts: 1,426

Cincinnati, Ohio, Ohio, USA
Cincinnati, Ohio
Ohio
USA

Gender: male
Re: recipe for finish
Reply #1 - Sep 10th, 2017 at 10:12am
 
For a number of years I've been very happy with a wiping varnish consisting of 50% mineral spirits and 50% Pratt & Lambert 38 gloss alkyd varnish.  I chose P&L 38 because of what seemed to be a consensus opinion that alkyd was the hardest of the three types of varnishes, and that P&L 38 was an especially clear alkyd varnish. 

If you are seeking a "water white" finish, meaning one that does not add any color or darkening to the wood, your options might be acrylic finishes and super blonde shellac.

Regardless of the "cut" (concentration, if you will) shellac is going to dry extremely fast.  Can't recall ever hearing if anyone was able to apply a friction polish on the lathe that did not include either boiled linseed or tung oil.  From experience, I know that a pure shellac solution is difficult to apply as a French polish on a flat surface - many many many very thin coats and one cannot go back over a coat before it has dried.
Back to top
  
WWW  
IP Logged
 
Ed Weber
WR Global Moderator
WR Patron
*****
Offline



Posts: 4,651

Wilton, California, USA
Wilton
California
USA

Gender: male

JET 1642
Grizzly G0584
Re: recipe for finish
Reply #2 - Sep 10th, 2017 at 10:39am
 
Rick Caron wrote on Sep 10th, 2017 at 9:23am:
I've using  half mineral spirits-half spar varnish,   And just a little bit of BLO to bring the grain out.  Works good  except does turn the wood  darker.
What would be the recipe for  shellac, DNA,  BLO, or should i leave out the BLO.      Tried this  years ago but it dried so fast   didn't have time to level out.   Maybe i had the  proportions wrong.     If i leave out the BLO  will the grain still pop?
Trying to get away from having the finish  darkening  the wood.


What "look" are you trying to achieve?

Don Stephan wrote on Sep 10th, 2017 at 10:12am:
I know that a pure shellac solution is difficult to apply as a French polish on a flat surface - many many many very thin coats and one cannot go back over a coat before it has dried.

When "French Polishing" ( I consider it a method of applying shellac not a finish itself) the recipe is Shellac and Alcohol, the oil is only used as a lubricant for application not part of the mixture.

I don't think you will get a very nice finish with the highlighted recipe. The shellac dries very quickly as the alcohol evaporates and the BLO remains wet. This can lead to smeary looking finish and you will need to remove the excess oil from the surface.
You may be better off leaving out the BLO
JMO

Back to top
  
 
IP Logged
 
Rick Caron
Active Member
WR Supporter
***
Offline


So many logs, so little
time!

Posts: 234

Greer, South Carolina, USA
Greer
South Carolina
USA

Gender: male
Re: recipe for finish
Reply #3 - Sep 10th, 2017 at 11:43am
 
Just want semi gloss clearer (than what i'm using now)     finish, and fill the pores quickly.   Applying   8+  coats   takes a lot of time.  3 coats would would save lots of time.
Back to top
« Last Edit: Sep 10th, 2017 at 11:45am by Rick Caron »  
 
IP Logged
 
Louie Powell
WR Devotee
*****
Offline



Posts: 655

Saratoga Springs, New York, USA
Saratoga Springs
New York
USA

Gender: male

PSI 12" Turncrafter Commander
Re: recipe for finish
Reply #4 - Sep 10th, 2017 at 12:21pm
 
Rick

There are many formulas.  A common recipe is equal parts of shellac, BLO, and DNA to make a friction polish.  But i've seen other recipes that vary the proportions. 

I do a friction polish with equal part of lacquer, Tung oil and lacquer thinner.

And my favorite wiping varnish is equal parts of McCloskey's Man-o-War spar varnish, Tung oil and turpentine.
Back to top
  

Louie
 
IP Logged
 
Ed Weber
WR Global Moderator
WR Patron
*****
Offline



Posts: 4,651

Wilton, California, USA
Wilton
California
USA

Gender: male

JET 1642
Grizzly G0584
Re: recipe for finish
Reply #5 - Sep 10th, 2017 at 12:38pm
 
Rick Caron wrote on Sep 10th, 2017 at 11:43am:
Just want semi gloss clearer (than what i'm using now)     finish, and fill the pores quickl

Does it matter to you if it's water-based, oil-based, or hybrid?

Off topic question for Louie
Louie Powell wrote on Sep 10th, 2017 at 12:21pm:
And my favorite wiping varnish is equal parts of McCloskey's Man-o-War spar varnish, Tung oil and turpentine.

Why use turpentine when the "thinner" in Man-O-War is Mineral spirits? IMO it would be better to keep the thinning agent the same. (also less smell)

Back to top
  
 
IP Logged
 
Don Stephan
WR Addict
*****
Offline


WR Rocks!

Posts: 1,426

Cincinnati, Ohio, Ohio, USA
Cincinnati, Ohio
Ohio
USA

Gender: male
Re: recipe for finish
Reply #6 - Sep 10th, 2017 at 5:18pm
 
Rick

I'll be following the discussion to hear how people fill pores on turnings.  Of course, red oak pores will require more time and effort to fill than say maple or walnut.  For what types of wood do you wish to fill the pores?

While I've never tried specifically to achieve a filled pore finish, 4 or 5 coats of my wiping varnish results in a smooth finish on maple and holly, but I believe there will still be some evidence of pores on black walnut and cherry.

If you aspire to a filled pore finish I wonder if brushing on a coat or two of sanding sealer would yield a thick enough dried film to allow sanding back to bare wood with the pores filled on walnut and cherry.  Sanding sealer is relatively soft and easy to sand, so this would be easier than sanding back varnish and probably acrylic.
Back to top
  
WWW  
IP Logged
 
Ed Weber
WR Global Moderator
WR Patron
*****
Offline



Posts: 4,651

Wilton, California, USA
Wilton
California
USA

Gender: male

JET 1642
Grizzly G0584
Re: recipe for finish
Reply #7 - Sep 10th, 2017 at 5:47pm
 
Multimedia File Viewing and Clickable Links are available for Registered Members only!!  You need to Login or Register
Back to top
  
 
IP Logged
 
Page Index Toggle Pages: 1
Send Topic Print