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Use of sanding sealer (Read 177 times)
 
Ralph Schipper
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Use of sanding sealer
Dec 2nd, 2017 at 3:40am
 
Hello people,

I've heard that people are using sanding sealers for a smooth result.
What I use for a smooth result is this:

- Sand till 600 grid
- put some eee ultra shine on it
- some danish oil (brings out the texture of the wood)
- friction polish if I want it to shine

If I buy a sanding sealer does that contribute anything to my way of finishing?
or can I skip a few steps from the above steps with a sanding sealer?

And I have also a piece of bee wax, I'm not sure of when of how to use the bee wax,
Is this like: sand to 600 grind and put the bee wax on, and polish it with a cloth while turning it?

Regards,

Ralph
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Ed Weber
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Re: Use of sanding sealer
Reply #1 - Dec 2nd, 2017 at 1:37pm
 
Danish oil, as the name suggests is an OIL. Oils are designed to penetrate into bare wood.
EEE Ultrashine is an abrasive wax. Wax is a top coat protection.
Friction polish is oil and shellac, basically a combination (quick & dirty) finish.

It's not recommended to apply a coat of oil over a coat of wax

It's difficult to suggest how you could change your finishing process without knowing what you're finishing and the look and protection you're after.
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Ralph Schipper
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Re: Use of sanding sealer
Reply #2 - Dec 2nd, 2017 at 1:51pm
 
Ed Weber wrote on Dec 2nd, 2017 at 1:37pm:
Danish oil, as the name suggests is an OIL. Oils are designed to penetrate into bare wood.
EEE Ultrashine is an abrasive wax. Wax is a top coat protection.
Friction polish is oil and shellac, basically a combination (quick & dirty) finish.

It's not recommended to apply a coat of oil over a coat of wax

It's difficult to suggest how you could change your finishing process without knowing what you're finishing and the look and protection you're after.


I do different projects, I think I can say that 95% of my projects destination are indoors, like the living room. There is bearly foodsafety involved.

Let's say I turn a lidded box.
And I want it silky smooth and shiny Smiley
apparently as you said Oil over wax is not a good idea.

Is this a good idea:
first Danish oil I love it how Danish oil gets the structure of the wood vissible.
Friction polish for the shiny part.
and eee ultrashine for silky smoothnes (the wax part)
or instead of ultra shine i could use bee wax?

if you click on the link under my signature you see the projects that I have allready done, to give you guys a idea.
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Al Wasser
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Re: Use of sanding sealer
Reply #3 - Dec 2nd, 2017 at 2:04pm
 
Bees Wax will not get you the shine you expect when you think wax.  It is closer to paraffin wax.  Turn a little piece of wood round and apply the bees wax to get a feel for it.
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Ed Weber
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Re: Use of sanding sealer
Reply #4 - Dec 2nd, 2017 at 2:26pm
 
Ralph Schipper wrote on Dec 2nd, 2017 at 1:51pm:
Is this a good idea:
first Danish oil I love it how Danish oil gets the structure of the wood vissible.
Friction polish for the shiny part.
and eee ultrashine for silky smoothnes (the wax part)
or instead of ultra shine i could use bee wax?


IMO that's the better approach to take. The Bee's wax will dull or mute the shine of the EEE ultrashine as Al said.
Make a small object and experiment.
Good luck
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chris lawrence
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Re: Use of sanding sealer
Reply #5 - Dec 2nd, 2017 at 2:32pm
 
Not much need to put anything on top of friction polish.  You can build  up friction polish.  Apply sevral layers at slow speed then turn the speed up to polish to a shine.  The more layers the smother it gets.  If its a piece that does not get touched heavly it will last a long time.
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Don Stephan
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Re: Use of sanding sealer
Reply #6 - Dec 2nd, 2017 at 7:48pm
 
"Friction polish" can be different combinations of items.  Can you be more specific?
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chris lawrence
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Re: Use of sanding sealer
Reply #7 - Dec 2nd, 2017 at 9:27pm
 
I use mylands friction polish.  Not sure exactly whats in it curently on vacation with no access to the bottle.  It has fare amount of solids in it needs to be shaken frequently while using to keep them suspended.  I can get a uniform and thick film without problems in about 5 minutes.
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Ed Weber
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Re: Use of sanding sealer
Reply #8 - Dec 2nd, 2017 at 9:56pm
 
"In general"
Friction polish
Commercial usually contains Ethanol or some type of solvent, linseed oil, shellac and wax
Commercial friction polish is a shellac and wax formulation lubricated by BLO, You need to shake the mixture to keep the wax suspended. When the appropriate amount of heat is generated (friction) it melts the wax and the mixture flows to an even smooth coating.
Basically you are applying a thin shellac finish and waxing at the same time.

Home made usually contains Alcohol, Linseed oil and shellac.
Home made is really just a thin shellac finish, it's lubricated by the BLO to be able to apply while under power on the lathe. You don't need to get it hot (little to no friction needed) since there is no wax to melt.
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Ralph Schipper
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Re: Use of sanding sealer
Reply #9 - Dec 3rd, 2017 at 1:53am
 
Don Stephan wrote on Dec 2nd, 2017 at 7:48pm:
"Friction polish" can be different combinations of items. Can you be more specific?


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Don Stephan
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Re: Use of sanding sealer
Reply #10 - Dec 3rd, 2017 at 10:19am
 
Like "friction polish" the term "danish oil" can refer to different mixes of ingredients, although generally it is a mix of mineral spirits, boiled linseed oil (BLO), and alkyd, polyurethane, or urethane varnish.

Several professional finishing writers have expressed the opinion that commercial "danish oil" is primarily mineral spirits and BLO, with only a small percentage of varnish.  A common formula for self-mixed is equal parts of mineral spirits, BLO, and varnish.  Jeff Jewitt wrote I think in one of his books that a mix of 1/9th BLO, and 4/9ths mineral spirits and varnish would result in the same look on the wood and be a harder finish.

It is my understanding that BLO and varnish need oxygen to begin curing, and time to fully cure.  And of course mineral spirits needs some time to evaporate.  When applied to raw wood, "danish oil" penetrates rapidly, leading some people (myself included) to offer a lot of "danish oil" in that first application to try to seal the surface.  I'm wondering if there is a possibility for a less than full cure, or bleedthrough, if that first application of "danish oil" is covered too quickly with a fast drying material like shellac or nitrocellulose lacquer.
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