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Sharpening Systems: Pros/Cons (Read 1,057 times)
 
robo_hippy
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Re: Sharpening Systems: Pros/Cons
Reply #15 - Dec 8th, 2017 at 5:23pm
 
As for how long the grinder burr lasts, I can't really remember what the burr off of a standard wheel is like. I have had CBN wheels for 10+ years, and that was about the time I started using scrapers for my roughing. With the V10, and M42HSS, the burr from a 180 grit CBN wheel is good for all of the roughing on several 12 inch bowls, and a good part of the shear scraping. With the Big Ugly tool, the burr off of a standard grinding wheel is good for about half a day of production turning on the Oregon Myrtle wood bowls. Not really sure about why, but figure that the CBN cuts differently than standard wheels, and is almost like a type of burnishing rather than just grinding and cutting. No way to back up that theory, just how it seems to me. I always figured that side ways honing on the bevels kind of did the same thing, especially with the finer grits. I need one of those 1000+ microscopes....

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Ed Weber
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Re: Sharpening Systems: Pros/Cons
Reply #16 - Dec 8th, 2017 at 6:15pm
 
I'm with you most of that Reed, I can't prove it but that's what It seems like to me. Undecided
I do know they cut differently
It "may" have something to do with the fact that the CBN abrasive is much more uniform than stone or friable wheels. Also a CBN wheel has a  uniform surface every time, where a friable wheel is only uniform after you dress it, then one use and it's less than flat.
The physical act of burnishing hardens the steel since you are literally realigning the molecules by pushing (smearing) them into the position you want.
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Glenn Roberts
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Re: Sharpening Systems: Pros/Cons
Reply #17 - Dec 8th, 2017 at 10:20pm
 
Grant wrote: "... I would strongly recommend finding one method that gets you repeatable results and stick with it."

This triangular jig sets the angle of the varigrind,and also the length of the bar the varigrind sits on. The 3 adjustment screws control those adjustments. Works great for me.
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« Last Edit: Dec 8th, 2017 at 10:28pm by Glenn Roberts »  

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John Grace
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Re: Sharpening Systems: Pros/Cons
Reply #18 - Dec 9th, 2017 at 9:11am
 
Next question...With respects to jig set-up, do you find yourselves changing the jig much for different tools or do you prefer to just set it and forget it?
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Glenn Roberts
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Re: Sharpening Systems: Pros/Cons
Reply #19 - Dec 9th, 2017 at 7:27pm
 

The jig is permanent, unless I decide to use a different grind for that particular tool.
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Ed Weber
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Re: Sharpening Systems: Pros/Cons
Reply #20 - Dec 10th, 2017 at 10:38am
 
I "typically" don't change the jig all that often.
I have a preferred grind for my spindle/detail gouges and a proffered grind for my bowl gouges. I don't often stray to far from my basic grinds.
This applies the the original and the Vari-Grind 2
It's easy enough to write down the setting that did and didn't work for you or put a mark on the jig where you use most often. as well as a jig like Glenn made.
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robo_hippy
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Re: Sharpening Systems: Pros/Cons
Reply #21 - Dec 10th, 2017 at 2:22pm
 
Ed, I have been pondering this, "The physical act of burnishing hardens the steel since you are literally realigning the molecules by pushing (smearing) them into the position you want." I never really thought about it this way. I do know that a hammer head will harden with years of pounding to the point of becoming brittle, even had one hammer head that lost a chip into my thumb... I always thought that the burnishing was more just bending the metal edge up rather than pushing molecules around... Since I grind the burnished part off, I would guess that this is minimal, and not close to what happens to the hammer...

One interesting side point on side scrapers, I saw Nick Stagg, A Brit who lives up by Salem, OR, and he was demonstrating how to turn a lamp. He used a scraper for cleaning up face grain work that had the burr totally honed off. It cut really cleanly, which really surprised me. He was using it for finish cuts, but not roughing. I tried it on some sugar maple, and it did work really well. I have tried it for shear scraping, but still prefer the burnished burr... It does not work as well with softer woods.

robo hippy
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Ed Weber
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Re: Sharpening Systems: Pros/Cons
Reply #22 - Dec 10th, 2017 at 3:10pm
 
If you ever look up anything about sharpening cabinet scrapers (card scrapers) you will most likely hear someone say that once burnished, the edge is now work hardened.
In a way it's cold forging, you are literally extruding the metal into the shape you want by pressure and no heat.

Here is the Wikapedia entry for "work hardening"
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robo_hippy
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Re: Sharpening Systems: Pros/Cons
Reply #23 - Dec 10th, 2017 at 5:01pm
 
I was trying to remember the term for it. I was thinking case hardening, but know that involves heat. Work hardening,,,,, I may remember that for a week.. Maybe... Thanks.

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Ed Weber
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Re: Sharpening Systems: Pros/Cons
Reply #24 - Dec 10th, 2017 at 5:30pm
 
robo_hippy wrote on Dec 10th, 2017 at 5:01pm:
I may remember that for a week.. Maybe...


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Don Stephan
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Re: Sharpening Systems: Pros/Cons
Reply #25 - Dec 10th, 2017 at 7:58pm
 
After seeing the trick on a Richard Raffan video, when I want to take a very fine scraper cut I will use a 600 diamond hone on both the surface and edge of the scraper, usually on the inside sides of turned lidded boxes.
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robo_hippy
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Re: Sharpening Systems: Pros/Cons
Reply #26 - Dec 10th, 2017 at 11:28pm
 
Don, that does work, more so in end grain than in bowl grain. I actually took the hone to the scraper, then took the scraper to the leather wheel on my Tormek. I could not feel any burr at all on it. I can feel a burr with hand honed 600 and 1000 grit stones.

robo hippy


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