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Gluing blanks (Read 544 times)
 
Micheal Gipson
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Gluing blanks
Feb 17th, 2018 at 8:47am
 
I am starting my first protect on my lathe. My of a lack of c clamps has stopped me from making my first blank. so i have to use a 4 x 4 blank of ceder and a face plate. i plane to make a cup.

should i glue it to another piece of wood or just go for it?

I saw a guy in a video use Tesa double sided tape to put a blank and another piece of wood together. Has anyone else done this?
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George Stratton
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Re: Gluing blanks
Reply #1 - Feb 17th, 2018 at 9:44am
 
I'm pretty new at this too Michael but from what I have learned on this forum, I would put a longer piece of that cedar between centers and practice turning spindle shapes to learn to use the tools before trying any cups or bowls. I built an entire spinning wheel unit which is mostly spindle work before I attempted a small bowl. JMO
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John Cepko
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Re: Gluing blanks
Reply #2 - Feb 17th, 2018 at 11:23am
 
Do you have a chuck for the lathe?
If so, between centers long enough to turn a tenon to grab with the chuck.
For my money, glue blocks can be unsafe if not applied 100% correctly. A new turner is going to have some spectacular catches, and a glue block is the weak link.
If your blank is square, find a way to knock the edges and corners off, saves a lot of time, and wear and tear on man and equipment.
Rub the bevel, and raise the handle until it begins to cut, Simple to say, execution is sometimes the problem.
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Grant Wilkinson
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Re: Gluing blanks
Reply #3 - Feb 17th, 2018 at 12:01pm
 
If you don't have a chuck, a face plate and a waste block are a good way to turn that 4 x 4 block. For a first cup, you could turn both the inside and outside of the piece without removing it from the waste block. Keep the tail stock engaged while you get the outside shape finished, then remove it to hollow out the cup.

As for attaching the cedar to the waste block, you can simply glue it or, as you mentioned, use strong double sided tape. If you glue, it when you are finished with the cup, you can simply part it off. Since this is your first piece, keep it simple.
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Grant Wilkinson
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Micheal Gipson
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Re: Gluing blanks
Reply #4 - Feb 17th, 2018 at 12:32pm
 
I don't have a chuck. That's one of my problems. In school I was spoiled with a 3 jaw. I'm starting with a cup so i can challenge myself and get back in the swing of things. thanks for the advice.  Smiley
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Arlin Eastman
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Re: Gluing blanks
Reply #5 - Feb 17th, 2018 at 2:52pm
 
George Stratton wrote on Feb 17th, 2018 at 9:44am:
I'm pretty new at this too Michael but from what I have learned on this forum, I would put a longer piece of that cedar between centers and practice turning spindle shapes to learn to use the tools before trying any cups or bowls. I built an entire spinning wheel unit which is mostly spindle work before I attempted a small bowl. JMO



I am with George with this.  If you are just getting back into it after being away from it awhile I would do more spindle turning first.  When I am away for several months I make several pens to get back into it and I consider myself pretty good turner.

Also is this cup to be used?  If so and you do not seal it really well you will have the tastes of Ceder in your drink for a while.
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Micheal Gipson
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Re: Gluing blanks
Reply #6 - Feb 17th, 2018 at 3:19pm
 
The cup could be used. I got some Butcher Block Conditioner i can use. but it will probably get used for screws or something.
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John Grace
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Re: Gluing blanks
Reply #7 - Feb 18th, 2018 at 9:05am
 
When I was in your shoes some years back, I'd use the face plate supported by the tailstock.  Turn the square blank to 'true' it up to round and then you can typically remove the tailstock...especially on a relatively small piece.  To me, the key points for you to consider is 1) the correct tool properly sharpened (for what you're doing a small bowl gouge or small scraper are the correct tools), and 2) correctly and slowly presenting the tool to the work piece.

Check out Brian Havens videos on YouTube...he has some very excellent fundamental videos on turning in general.

Before starting, however, at least get a face shield.  Don't care how good you are...wood is an imperfect medium and even the best preparations and methods can sometimes end badly.
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Don Stephan
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Re: Gluing blanks
Reply #8 - Feb 18th, 2018 at 11:29am
 
Michael

Congrats on succumbing to the lure of woodturning and welcome to the forum.  This is a tremendous source of information and support.  The Internet can be an overwhelming collection of written and video information, but unfortunately some is inaccurate, ineffective, or even unsafe.

One of the most effective ways to learn and develop effective and safe lathe experience is through a local woodturning group.  Most have a list of pre-qualified mentors, many offer classes and workshops, allow one to see and ideally test drive tools and accessories before buying, and so on.

I am not comfortable offering up specific solutions without some awareness of one's prior experience, equipment, budget, and short and long term goals.  What's your experience and skill level with spindle gouges, bowl gouges, skew, and scraper.  What is the size of your lathe and what accessories and tools do you have.  What is your sharpening experience and equipment?  Is your immediate interest things like spinning tops, childrens toys, speaker gavel and base, and solid and hollow holiday ornaments (spindle work)?  Is your immediate interest bowls, cups, and platters?  If unsure, by all means join a local woodturning group to gain some knowledge and exposure before maxing out one or two credit cards (lol).

If you want to start with spindle work, a steb or 4 spur drive center for the drive spindle, a live center for the tailstock, a spindle roughing gouge, 3/4" bar diameter spindle gouge, and 1" skew are common tools.

If you wish to start with bowls, cups and platters, different work holding accessories and tools are common.  Typical initial ways to hold bowl blanks include flat or screw faceplates (perhaps in conjunction with glue blocks) and four jaw chucks.  Basic bowl tools can include a 1/2" or 3/4" bar diameter bowl gouge and a 1" scraper with a curved left edge.

Some may suggest carbide tipped tools as a way to immediately begin spindle and/or bowl work without taking the time to learn how to sharpen, and move more traditional gouges and scrapers - I have no experience with them and cannot offer any comment.

There are perhaps three easy ways to get frustrated with initial lathe experience.  One might be only to practice tool presentation and movement for hours on end without making something.  Another might be to immediately suffer catches and poor quality results from trying to make projects too quickly.  A third, with bowl work, might becoming overwhelmed by the different approaches, such as a four jaw chuck, a faceplate, even a vacuum chuck, too early.

For beginning spindle work, 2x2 stock from a big box store or lumberyard is extremely economical and easy to turn, if you stay away from knots.  Once some tool comfort and expertise is developed, thicker poplar is excellent turning stock if one has a local source and the equipment to break down a 2" or thicker board into appropriate sized blanks.  For beginning bowl work, 5 1/2" squares of 2x6 again from a big box store or lumberyard is very economical, easy to work, and economical if one uses a faceplate and glueblock.  With any of a number of different appropriate finishes, a 2x6 bowl can be a very serviceable cereal, snack, or daily utility bowl.
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« Last Edit: Feb 18th, 2018 at 11:39am by Don Stephan »  
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Don Stephan
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Re: Gluing blanks
Reply #9 - Feb 18th, 2018 at 11:42am
 
As already mentioned, a REGULARLY USED faceshield 87.1+ impact rating is considered by many an essential first lathe "tool."  If you want to learn more about glue blocks, a video by Lyle Jamieson is the most thorough coverage I have seen.  There may also be one or more in the video section of this forum.
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Micheal Gipson
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Re: Gluing blanks
Reply #10 - Feb 18th, 2018 at 6:33pm
 
Thank you very much. You all have been very helpful. I have gone with just spindle work and talked to my old wood shop teacher. just a spur center and a live center. I just don't want to wast a 4 x 4 of good ceder. Not having c clamps is a pain. but i did get the wood for 70% off.
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John Cepko
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Re: Gluing blanks
Reply #11 - Feb 19th, 2018 at 11:28am
 
Free wood is everywhere, and a few well placed gifts like pens or bowls can get you a never ending supply.
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