Woodturner's Resource
Woodturner's Resource  
  Featured Artist    Websites   Support Wr
Tutorials, Projects & Tips   Event Calendar   Tool and Book Store
  Home Page Forum HelpSearch Map TPT Resources LoginRegister
 
Pages: 1 2 
Send Topic Print
Sanding discs (Read 750 times)
 
Don Stephan
WR Addict
*****
Offline


WR Rocks!

Posts: 1,729

Cincinnati, Ohio, Ohio, USA
Cincinnati, Ohio
Ohio
USA

Gender: male
Re: Sanding discs
Reply #15 - Jul 23rd, 2018 at 4:50pm
 
My thought is to focus.on getting the surface as smooth as possible with square end scraper and/or skew as a scraper.  You probably also use sheet sandpaper torn or cut into quarters - use a corner of 220 and 320.
Back to top
  
WWW  
IP Logged
 
Jeff Vanden Boogart
WR Addict
*****
Offline


WR Rocks!

Posts: 759

Rural Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA
Rural Green Bay
Wisconsin
USA

Gender: male

PM 3520
Re: Sanding discs
Reply #16 - Jul 23rd, 2018 at 9:21pm
 
I use a tenon!  Roll Eyes I think Vince has 1" discs
Back to top
  
 
IP Logged
 
robo_hippy
WR Addict
*****
Offline



Posts: 2,698

Eugene, OR, USA
Eugene, OR
USA

Re: Sanding discs
Reply #17 - Jul 24th, 2018 at 10:23am
 
For sanding the inside of a recess, first, I use a shear scrape with the small fluteless gouge from Doug Thompson, which leaves a 220 grit surface. My big recess is 2 5/8 inch so a 2 inch disc on a firm pad works great. For the smaller recess, I use a 1 inch pad. The edge of the recess will form a dove tail on the firm pad. I do have 1 and 2 inch inside diameter pipe sections that have been sharpened so I can punch out special sized discs for these pads.

Ed, getting back to abrasives, blades, bits, and speeds, I am trying to figure out how going too slow generated heat. I know if I am going slow and pushing too hard, then the motor can get too hot from overloading it. I would think that as long as feed rate matches speed, and things are sharp, there would not be a heat build up.

Comparing cutting blades to abrasives, they are both cutting tools, but work very differently. I remember Jimmy Clewes commenting that abrasives are not a cutting tool, only scratching, compared to blades and knife/skew/gouge edges which slice. After pondering that one for a while, my thoughts are that both have serrations in the edges that cut. The difference is that with the blade edges, these serrations are lined up on an edge, and with abrasives, they are lined up on a plane. This is, to me, the main reason that abrasives cut way better at slower speeds. Applying this to drill sanders, and drum sanders, I figure there has to be optimum speeds for the different grits, which would be slower than the optimum speeds for planers. I may have to just find a small pulley for my drum sander and try it out....

robo hippy
Back to top
  
WWW  
IP Logged
 
Rick Caron
WR Supporter
*****
Offline


So many logs, so little
time!

Posts: 289

Greer, South Carolina, USA
Greer
South Carolina
USA

Gender: male
Re: Sanding discs
Reply #18 - Jul 26th, 2018 at 4:13pm
 
I need to reacher     i" sanding discs     from Vince's      does he have   pads/ drives for these  1 " pads???
Back to top
  
 
IP Logged
 
Ed Weber
WR Administrator
WR Patron
*****
Online



Posts: 5,387

Wilton, California, USA
Wilton
California
USA

Gender: male

JET 1642
Grizzly G0584
Re: Sanding discs
Reply #19 - Jul 27th, 2018 at 9:41am
 
robo_hippy wrote on Jul 24th, 2018 at 10:23am:
I am trying to figure out how going too slow generated heat.


Anything that cuts wood is a variation of a chisel (a cutting point) in some fashion or another.

How much material you remove is one factor. The more material you try to remove at one time the greater the heat generated. More effort is needed to overcome the friction created by the blade or bit, greater amount of heat is produced.
How fast you remove material. The faster you remove material, the more heat generated. there is less time for the heat to dissipate from the blade or bit.
Sanding too slowly or sanding in one spot (this is feed rate) for an extended period of time, heat will build up in the wood since it can't dissipate and is conducted back into the sanding device, disc, drum, pad, etc.
Have you ever gone too slowly when routing something, the wood can burn. Make the same pass at a higher feed rate and no burn.

In your case, if you slow down your drum, great. Just don't slow down the feed rate too much. you don't want the drum lingering over the same spot for too long a time.
You'll need to remove less material with each pass but you shouldn't generate as much heat, that's the trade off.
Back to top
  
 
IP Logged
 
Rick Caron
WR Supporter
*****
Offline


So many logs, so little
time!

Posts: 289

Greer, South Carolina, USA
Greer
South Carolina
USA

Gender: male
Re: Sanding discs
Reply #20 - Jul 29th, 2018 at 9:50am
 
Thanks Jeff   Vince does have 1 1/4"  sanding discs
Back to top
  
 
IP Logged
 
robo_hippy
WR Addict
*****
Offline



Posts: 2,698

Eugene, OR, USA
Eugene, OR
USA

Re: Sanding discs
Reply #21 - Jul 29th, 2018 at 2:44pm
 
If you want 1 inch discs, a piece of 1 inch inside diameter pipe will punch fine on some 1/2 inch plastic. I have punched out my old interface pads as well, and I do know there are some 1 inch mandrills out there some where as I have several of them...

robo hippy
Back to top
  
WWW  
IP Logged
 
Pages: 1 2 
Send Topic Print