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80 Grit Gouge or Gooseneck Card Scraper (Read 170 times)
 
Don Stephan
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80 Grit Gouge or Gooseneck Card Scraper
Oct 7th, 2018 at 5:53pm
 
Of course, none of us EVER have maddening tiny grooves or ridges on the inside wall of a bowl, but perhaps a friend will ask how to remove them during sanding.

After going through three 2" 80 grit sanding disks on a 14" bowl, and still having more ridges/grooves to remove, I decided to try my gooseneck card scraper.  Again of course, I used it with the lathe OFF.

On the outer curve of the gooseneck scraper, the radius of curvature varies, so it is possible to find a spot on the scraper that matches closely the curvature of the bowl wall.  I found that the scraper removed the ridges/grooves much faster than 80 grit sandpaper, and I was able to start real sanding at 120 grit.  The gooseneck scraper was a real time saver. 

On the Internet, I found a set of four (two sizes and two metal thicknesses) at Highland Hardware, and the following link hopefully points to them

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The gooseneck card scraper won't work as easily on smaller diameter bowls, but of course there won't be as many linear inches of ridges/grooves to remove, and sanding won't take forever.
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Ed Weber
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Re: 80 Grit Gouge or Gooseneck Card Scraper
Reply #1 - Oct 8th, 2018 at 7:55am
 
I don't want to be a wet blanket but card scrapers aren't really for compound concave surfaces.
They are for curves yes but straight curves, like a cove, channel or arched panel of some type.
That being said, use what you have to, to get the job done.
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Ed Weber
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Re: 80 Grit Gouge or Gooseneck Card Scraper
Reply #2 - Oct 8th, 2018 at 8:37am
 
Another suggestion, or more accurately tool, would be Multimedia File Viewing and Clickable Links are available for Registered Members only!!  You need to Login or Register
These are 1/8" thick and do not bend or flex when in use and may work better for your situation.
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robo_hippy
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Re: 80 Grit Gouge or Gooseneck Card Scraper
Reply #3 - Oct 8th, 2018 at 11:06am
 
Well, a few things here... The outside of the bowl is pretty easy. The inside is much more difficult. Besides working on perfecting turning technique (move with your body, not your arms...) there are a number of techniques to improve that inside surface. Cheat! I prefer a shear scrape (one whole video devoted to that, in the video section here, or on You Tube) for the side walls and into the transition. For across the bottom and into the transition, this is where the NRS (negative rake scraper) excels. A standard scraper will do fairly well across the bottom, and just barely into the transition, but not nearly as well up the sides of the bowl. The reason being that sweeping across the grain doesn't tear nearly as much as going through the grain like you do when you try to finish cut with a scraper on bowl walls. Add to that, the rim is very  wobbly and a scraper cut can start wall vibrations to the point where you get a major catch and explosion.... Been there and done that, once... The NRS does okay on the walls, but it is still a scraping cut and will pull a bit more than a shear scrape. It does take out the ripples though. How clean or rough the remaining surface depends a lot on the wood too. A NRS will leave a cleaner surface on sugar/hard maple than it will on poplar or alder. I do have another video about smoothing the inside of a bowl, and need to update that one some day to a specific video on turning the inside of a bowl. The biggest problem area for most bowl turners.... I need another video on the NRS as well. Biggest point on them, a sweep from center to rim of a 14 inch bowl, and your burr is gone. High maintenance tool, and it may take several passes to remove tool marks. If you have to push at all with it, the tool is dull....

Other than that, get rid of the 2 inch discs, except for tiny bowls. A 3 inch disc has more than twice the surface area of a 2 inch disc. Also, use a firm or hard interface pad. I prefer the ones from Vince Welch that have the 1/4 round edge profile rather than the square edge. Much better for the inside of the bowl. With Vince's blue discs, I can easily get the outside and inside of a 14 inch bowl. Slow speed sanding, 600 rpm or less.... cuts far better than high speed sanding. About the only time I use 80 grit any more is to remove 'oxidation' from dried warped bowls.

Oh yea, the StewMac scrapers. They have a number of fans in the wood turning world. The CBN wheels will do an excellent job of sharpening them, and you can burnish a burr on them with a micro grained carbide burnisher...

robo hippy
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« Last Edit: Oct 8th, 2018 at 11:08am by robo_hippy »  
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Simon Barnard
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Re: 80 Grit Gouge or Gooseneck Card Scraper
Reply #4 - Oct 10th, 2018 at 8:41am
 
I have a selection of ‘mini’ card scrapers I made by cutting a rectangular one into various shapes and filing to nice smooth curves of various radii.  Sharpened in same way as normal cabinet scraper and held directly to wood by hand with tool rest removed / out of the way at approx 30 deg to give shearing action.

Works really well and you can feel the shape being evened out.

Normal warning applies to all internet advice - folks in hi-vis jackets won’t like this one so caveat emptor!
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« Last Edit: Oct 10th, 2018 at 8:42am by Simon Barnard »  
 
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