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Ebonising Spray (Read 270 times)
 
Wil Russell
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Ebonising Spray
Nov 8th, 2018 at 9:10am
 
Do you really need to buy proper Ebonising spray marketed specifically at wood turners or would any satin black spray paint work? Which would be best to try, Acrylic or Cellulose, assuming you have a choice locally?
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Ed Weber
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Re: Ebonising Spray
Reply #1 - Nov 8th, 2018 at 9:17am
 
Kind of a loaded question Wil, are you looking to go full black or retain some notice of grain. There is a difference between ebonizing, which is a chemical reaction and painting which is simply coating or staining.
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David Moeller
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Re: Ebonising Spray
Reply #2 - Nov 8th, 2018 at 11:31am
 
On small items such as finials i use liquid shoe dye & apply finish after assy.
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Wil Russell
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Re: Ebonising Spray
Reply #3 - Nov 8th, 2018 at 11:45am
 
What I want to do is use the Ebonising spray on a yet to be turned Ash bowl then fill in the grain with gold gilt cream. I’ve seen lots of examples and it looks really nice. Most of them seem to have been done using Chestnuts Ebonising spray lacquer and then their gilt cream. Unfortunately I don’t seem to have a local stockist for the spray.  Sad
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Wil Russell
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Re: Ebonising Spray
Reply #4 - Nov 8th, 2018 at 12:16pm
 
Here’s a quick video of the effect:

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Al Wasser
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Re: Ebonising Spray
Reply #5 - Nov 8th, 2018 at 2:27pm
 
For that you can use black spray laquer
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Ed Weber
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Re: Ebonising Spray
Reply #6 - Nov 8th, 2018 at 2:31pm
 
A quick look at the Health & Safety sheet and I would say set down the can and walk or possibly run away.

I didn't see that the product had any type if iron in it, which is often used to ebonize. The iron reacts with the natural tannins in the wood and blackens it. This product seems to be a type of colored lacquer, no idea what in the coloring.
I know that not much help, sorry
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Bruce Schoenleber
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Re: Ebonising Spray
Reply #7 - Nov 8th, 2018 at 5:46pm
 
India ink?
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Don Stephan
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Re: Ebonising Spray
Reply #8 - Nov 8th, 2018 at 8:06pm
 
The effect requires an opaque black thin film that does not fill the pores.  Common black spray paint that builds to a fully opaque black likely would be so thick that it would at least partially fill the pores.
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Louie Powell
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Re: Ebonising Spray
Reply #9 - Nov 9th, 2018 at 8:06am
 
My shop is in the basement of our home.  I do have an exterior door that I can open in warm weather, but winter is coming, and that door will be closed for the next several months.  So I try to stay away from aerosol finishes. 

It's very easy to make an ebonizing solution that can be brushed or wiped on the turning.  Just soak a steel wool pad in some white vinegar for a week or two.  The result is an iron acetate solution that will react with the tannin in the wood to produce a natural deep brown/black color.  Works best with high tannin timbers like oak and ash, but those are also the best timbers for the effect shown in the video that requires a strong grain pattern in the wood.
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David Fritz
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Re: Ebonising Spray
Reply #10 - Nov 9th, 2018 at 8:59am
 
This worked nicely. Multimedia File Viewing and Clickable Links are available for Registered Members only!!  You need to Login or Register and doesn't involve much expense.
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Don Stephan
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Re: Ebonising Spray
Reply #11 - Nov 9th, 2018 at 9:20am
 
One approach makes the pores a very light color against very dark side grain, and the other makes the pores a very dark color against a light (essentially un colored) side grain.  And the latter, relying solely on wax, would not offer protection against water drops.
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David Fritz
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Re: Ebonising Spray
Reply #12 - Nov 10th, 2018 at 9:20am
 
Don, I'm not sure I understand what you mean by side grain. I've always called the difference in the growth rings summer growth and winter growth, with the summer growth having more open grain than the summer growth.

Is "side grain" one or the other of the above or something else? Thanks for helping me understand.
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Louie Powell
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Re: Ebonising Spray
Reply #13 - Nov 10th, 2018 at 12:50pm
 
David Fritz wrote on Nov 10th, 2018 at 9:20am:
Don, I'm not sure I understand what you mean by side grain. I've always called the difference in the growth rings summer growth and winter growth, with the summer growth having more open grain than the summer growth.

Is "side grain" one or the other of the above or something else? Thanks for helping me understand.


This is a confusing point, and I suspect casual language adds to the problem.

End grain:  If you are at the top of a tree, looking down toward the ground, you are looking at 'end grain'.  The same can be said if you are at the end of a branch and looking back toward the trunk of the tree.  That is, the basic fibers in the timber run from the bottom to the top of the tree and tend to act like straws that draw water and nourishment from the roots up to the crown of the tree. The most common analogy is to think of wood as a bundle of soda straws - 'end grain' is like looking into the end of that bundle.  "End grain' is also sometimes called 'short grain'.

Everything else is referred to as either 'long grain', 'side grain' or 'face grain'.  In the analogy, 'long grain' is like looking at the side of the bundle of straws.  The term 'long grain' is fairly descriptive and easily understood.   'Side grain' and 'face grain' are more confusing and tend to refer to the surfaces of a milled board.  However, wood turners use  'face grain' describe turnings in which the basic grain structure of the timber is perpendicular to the axis of rotation, regardless of the shape of the original blank from which that turning was created.

The thing that David is referring to related to summer growth versus winter growth has to with the pattern created when cutting the annular growth rings.  Some timbers display dramatic growth rings, while others do not.  And the way the timber is milled has a very significant impact on how those growth rings.  So-called 'flat sawn' timber shows off the growth rings, while 'rift sawn' timber disguises the growth rings. 

As you shape wood by turning it, you have the opportunity to expose layers of growth rings - its the combination of the basic circular shape of those rings and the way that the circular turning is formed that creates the patterns that can be enhanced by the surface treatment that Wil asked about in the original post.
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Ed Weber
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Re: Ebonising Spray
Reply #14 - Nov 10th, 2018 at 12:58pm
 
Louie Powell wrote on Nov 10th, 2018 at 12:50pm:
This is a confusing point, and I suspect casual language adds to the problem.


Why would this be any different? Roll Eyes Smiley
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