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LED lights (Read 149 times)
 
Ralph Fahringer
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Ellsworth, Maine, USA
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LED lights
Dec 4th, 2018 at 4:54pm
 
I just had my shop retrofitted to 4" LED strips.

I had seven,  4' fluorescent hanging lights in there and the State of Maine has one of those energy programs to help offset the costs.

Luckily, they were not hard wired,

What would have cost $616.00 only cost me $154.00. Smiley Smiley



We are also replacing all of the lights in my store.. 18 ceiling fixtures with 4 tubes each.

Hope next Monday when I'm closed.

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Ed Weber
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Wilton, California, USA
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Re: LED lights
Reply #1 - Dec 4th, 2018 at 5:14pm
 
How do you like the LED's so far?
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Allan Miller
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Eclectic, Alabama, USA
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Re: LED lights
Reply #2 - Dec 5th, 2018 at 7:43am
 
Love my led strips in my shop, just have to make sure you get the “intensity” that suits you best. I settled on “Daylight”, I think they are around 6500K rating. If I am looking at a piece I am working on and take it outside to look at there is really not much difference between shop light and sun light, although when dealing with painted pieces they do appear a little lighter in the shop compared to sunlight.
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Ralph Fahringer
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Ellsworth, Maine, USA
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Re: LED lights
Reply #3 - Dec 5th, 2018 at 9:39am
 
It  really is a big difference in the quality of light. I haven't had a chance to do any work in it yet. Looks nice, tho. Smiley

As for the lights in the store, I had them order lights with a 3000º color temp as it is more like what would be found in a house setting.

I do framing and printing of art and as it is viewed in their home, it makes sense to try to be close to how they view it.

My store also gets a nice mix of north light as well as the overhead fixtures.

My current fluor. tubes are a full spectrum light of around 3000º.
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Lee Watermann
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Re: LED lights
Reply #4 - Dec 5th, 2018 at 10:15pm
 
I put in LEDs in my shop and soon after I saw vids how bad LEDs are for your eyes. Look it up. I got into blue blocker glasses.
Just sayin.
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Wil Russell
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Re: LED lights
Reply #5 - Dec 6th, 2018 at 5:39am
 
Some of the LED’s I’ve seen in commercial properties are pretty good. The light quality of the ones I’ve seen offered to the public are pretty poor, irrespective of what “colour” you choose. Of the ones I have bought not one of them has lasted anywhere near as long as they’re supposed to. I won’t be buying anything to replace the tubes in my workshop for the foreseeable future. The cost of running my workshop lighting is quite modest so unless the price of buying LEDs drops considerably it makes no sense for me. If I had a very large workspace with a high ceiling it may be a different matter. I also suffer from migraines at times and the jury is still out about whether LED’s can make things worse.
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Ron Sardo
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Re: LED lights
Reply #6 - Dec 6th, 2018 at 2:53pm
 
I've been using 4' LED lights for 3 years.

I started using them to start my veggies in February and to grow arugula and bib lettuce in the winter. I get tomatoes 2 months before everyone else by me and have fresh greens all year round. 8 tubes total and they are on for 16 hours every day.

As fluorescent tubes started to burn out in my shop I removed the ballast from the fixture and installed LED lights. 4 fixtures down 4 to go. A typical T8 ballast uses 32w to run. (NOTE: Some LED lights need a ballast to run. Make sure you get the right ones if you want to do this)

I picked up a 6 pack of LED lights that can screw into a incandescent light socket. They had the same lumens as a 60w bulb and are made by GE. The cost was a little more than $10 and plan to buy more the next time I see them on the shelves.
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Louie Powell
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Re: LED lights
Reply #7 - Dec 7th, 2018 at 1:28pm
 
I am gradually transitioning to LEDs in our home.  Some thoughts - - -

1.  LED lights, like CFL lights before them, vary with manufacturer.  The major manufacturers (GE, Osram-Sylvania, Philips, etc) produce good lamps that on-average last as long as they are advertised to last.  Note, however, that life expectancy is statistical - some last less, some last longer.  These bulbs typically are more expensive.  But there are cheaper 'brand X' bulbs that have the same nominal characteristics, but don't last as long.  Like everything else - you get what you pay for. 

2.  Ron said 'Some LED lights need a ballast to run. Make sure you get the right ones if you want to do this'.  What is happening here is that some bulbs are meant to be replacements for fluorescent tubes without the need to remove the ballast.  Basically, they are intended for folks who want LEDs, but who don't want to have to rewire the fixture.  Generally, they have the same life expectancy as other LED bulbs, but the overall energy consumption is greater because you still have the losses associated with the ballast.

3.  There are dimmable LEDs that can replace incandescent lamps on circuits with dimmers.  However, dimmers for use with incandescent bulbs don't always work well with LEDs - you can't dim them as much, and sometimes you get flickering when you dim them.  This isn't harmful or dangerous, its just the way that those dimmers work.  However, you can purchase 'pulse-width modulated' dimmers that are specifically designed for use with LED bulbs that offer a wider dimming range without flicker.   We have a dimmable pot light over our kitchen sink that we usually leave on all night; I recently replaced the incandescent bulb with a dimmable LED.  Most of the time, it generates constant output, but I've noticed pronounced flicker a few times.  Fortunately, my wife hasn't seen it and made me change out the dimmer (yet).

4.  I suspect that there may be a scientific explanation although I don't know what it is, but my experience is that 'daylight'  LEDs (and CFLs)  - typically 5000-6000 deg kelvin - yield higher perceived brightness than bulbs that operate at warmer temperatures (such as 'warm white'), even through the lumen (light output) rating is the same.  The light produced by 'daylight' bulbs is more blue than the light from warmer bulbs, and some people find that objectionable.  For most in-home applications, I prefer warm white, but I use daylight in my shop where I want more brightness.

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« Last Edit: Dec 7th, 2018 at 1:31pm by Louie Powell »  

Louie
 
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