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question on turning pine (Read 174 times)
 
Steven Hensley
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question on turning pine
May 5th, 2019 at 6:04pm
 
Hi
I picked up a pine stump with some roots. I chain sawed the roots off and cut the stump down to just the part the roots came out of. that portion was really hard and the saw wouldn't make it through. I am thinking that it may be hard enough to turn. what do you think. the saw went through the roots and stump like butter, the chain is sharp.
Has anyone used pine I have been practicing on glued up 2x4s I thought the wood around the roots would be good for turning. am i wrong or not.Thank you
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chris lawrence
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Re: question on turning pine
Reply #1 - May 5th, 2019 at 8:10pm
 
It might be a rock the roots grew around?
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Robert Fischer
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Re: question on turning pine
Reply #2 - May 6th, 2019 at 8:13am
 
I don't know the answer, but I'm interested because I live in the Pine Tree State (Maine) and there's a lot of free pine roots available (some on my property).   Free is good! Thumbs Up
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Don Stephan
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Re: question on turning pine
Reply #3 - May 6th, 2019 at 8:14am
 
My experience is the figured wood at the base of a tree fork is much harder than the surrounding non-figured wood.  By analogy, the center of the root ball might be wood similar to the center of the base of a fork above ground.

Somewhere I seem to recall a mention of pressure washing a root ball before taking a chain saw to it, possibly to remove as much as soil-embedded rock and grit as possible.  And Chris makes a very good point - there could be rock(s) trapped between roots as they increase in diameter.
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Steven Hensley
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Re: question on turning pine
Reply #4 - May 6th, 2019 at 10:38am
 
I am sure it is not a rock, It most likly the figured wood.
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Dick Bernard
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Re: question on turning pine
Reply #5 - Jul 20th, 2019 at 6:03am
 
If you are using a chainsaw to cut the roots you are probably going to hit some dirt.  Hitting dirt is very bad for the chain. You can't pull the chainsaw out quick enough. If you hit a rock and/or dirt, the cutting teeth on your chainsaw are dull.

Somebody mentioned pressure washing the roots. This is very helpful just as long as you take time to do a good job. If you leave just one small rock that might be embedded in the root and you hit it with the chain well, back to the sharpening station.

Dick
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Don Stephan
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Re: question on turning pine
Reply #6 - Jul 20th, 2019 at 8:04am
 
Regarding "glued up 2x4's," for 2x6 is an excellent material for bowl turning practice.  Incredibly inexpensive, easy to find and transport, and sometimes even makes an attractive small bowl.  2x8 and larger is southern yellow pine, which has late season growth much more dense than early season growth.  Still very affordable and easy to find, but a bit more challenging to turn due to the varying density.
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Ed Weber
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Re: question on turning pine
Reply #7 - Jul 20th, 2019 at 8:55am
 
Don Stephan wrote on May 6th, 2019 at 8:14am:
My experience is the figured wood at the base of a tree fork is much harder than the surrounding non-figured wood.


I personally don't have any issues with turning any softwoods like pine, sharp tools and proper technique overcome a lot. The issue with softwoods is usually the sanding. Pine and others usually have large annual rings which vary from soft (early spring growth) to hard (late summer/fall growth). When sanding you need to be careful not to over sand the soft grain. I would suggest always using a sanding pad of some kind
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