Woodturner's Resource
Woodturner's Resource  
  • Featured Artist    • Websites   Support Wr
Tutorials, Projects & Tips   • Event Calendar   • Tool and Book Store
  Home Page Forum HelpSearch Map TPT Resources LoginRegister
 
Pages: 1 2 
Send Topic Print
Bowl Turning 101 Question (Read 689 times)
 
Ed Weber
WR Administrator
WR Patron
*****
Offline



Posts: 6,423

Wilton, California, USA
Wilton
California
USA

Gender: male

JET 1642
Grizzly G0584
Bowl Turning 101 Question
Jun 14th, 2019 at 1:03pm
 
When starting to turn a bowl from a round or roundish blank, how do you start?
You mount the blank on the lathe however you prefer, then you ....????
Where do you start?
Do you true up the edge first before you start to shape the face?
OR
Do you check for balance and go directly to working on the face?
Back to top
  
 
IP Logged
 
Glenn Jacobs
WR Addict
*****
Offline


JC L&S

Posts: 1,408

North DFW, Texas, USA
North DFW
Texas
USA

Gender: male

Grizzly 462
Re: Bowl Turning 101 Question
Reply #1 - Jun 14th, 2019 at 2:29pm
 
I use either between centers or face plate. Liking the face plate better these days. Make blank round, then work on shape. Turn bottom for chuck, reverse, hollow out inside. Then SAND SAND, SAND.

Glenn J.
Back to top
  
Glenn+J  
IP Logged
 
George Stratton
Active Member
***
Offline


WR Rocks!

Posts: 235

Gender: male

Old Delta 12" 46-701 in great condition. Had it about 20+ years and turned 1 part.
Re: Bowl Turning 101 Question
Reply #2 - Jun 14th, 2019 at 2:44pm
 
Haven't made that many but pretty much follow the way Glenn does. Faceplate with screws and then finish the bottom. I like the dovetail recess left in, reason, no idea just like it and burn my initials there with the date. The grandkids wind up with them anyway.
Back to top
  
 
IP Logged
 
Don Stephan
WR Addict
*****
Offline


WR Rocks!

Posts: 2,069

Cincinnati, Ohio, Ohio, USA
Cincinnati, Ohio
Ohio
USA

Gender: male
Re: Bowl Turning 101 Question
Reply #3 - Jun 14th, 2019 at 7:26pm
 
Most of my blanks are octagonal at best with lots of bark on the sides and "bottom," facing the tailstock.  True up the side to good wood, true up at least the outer inch of the "top," facing the headstock.  True up the bottom.  Lay out where the tenon will be and shape the outside, then finish the tenon.

But I'll work on all of these more or less simultaneously.
Back to top
  
WWW  
IP Logged
 
robo_hippy
WR Addict
*****
Offline



Posts: 2,909

Eugene, OR, USA
Eugene, OR
USA

Re: Bowl Turning 101 Question
Reply #4 - Jun 14th, 2019 at 7:54pm
 
Well, I slab them up with the chainsaw (my chainsaw chopsaw), or some times on my big bandsaw. I cut them into a circle, again on the bandsaw. I drill a recess for my big chuck to expand into (2 5/8 inch) for mounting it on the lathe. I turn up the speed till there is vibration, then back it off a bit. True up the bottom, scraping cut with scrapers of course, but some times with gouge in a scraping mode, flutes on the side. True up the outside of the blank, again with scraper pushing down the side. Then true up the top of the blank. Turn up the speed again, then rough to shape with scraper (Big Ugly tool). Finish cuts with gouge, shear scrape, turn recess, reverse. Big Ugly to hog out the inside, 45/45 for finish cut down the side. BOB tools for the transition and across the bottom, and NRS to clean up the bottom when it needs it. Shear scrape the bowl sides if it needs it.

robo hippy
Back to top
  
WWW  
IP Logged
 
Ed Weber
WR Administrator
WR Patron
*****
Offline



Posts: 6,423

Wilton, California, USA
Wilton
California
USA

Gender: male

JET 1642
Grizzly G0584
Re: Bowl Turning 101 Question
Reply #5 - Jun 14th, 2019 at 8:12pm
 
Thanks for the input everyone.
I see many people true up the perimeter of the rough blank but never seem to explain or understand why, this made me curious.
Once I have a somewhere near round blank mounted, I don't usually bother with truing up the perimeter unless there is a vibration issue or I need a specific size for something.
I figure if it's not affecting anything, why true it up just to cut it away. Undecided
I typically just determine the size of the recess or tenon and then go directly to removing the waste, regardless if the blank is truly round or not. As I progress through the shaping, 90 percent of that area will be turned away.

Everyone does it differently
Back to top
  
 
IP Logged
 
Arlin Eastman
Senior Member
****
Offline


Born in the USA

Posts: 324

Council Bluffs, Iowa, USA
Council Bluffs
Iowa
USA

Gender: male

PM3520B
Re: Bowl Turning 101 Question
Reply #6 - Jun 14th, 2019 at 8:17pm
 
Me I try to get them close to balanced so I can turn up the speed for better cuts and less chatter.  I do not hardly ever true up the edge on a bowl or platter since I cut from the back to the front to speed up the cutting process.
Back to top
  

It is always the right time;  To do the right thing
 
IP Logged
 
chris lawrence
Active Member
***
Offline


WR Rocks!

Posts: 149

JACKSON, New Jersey, USA
JACKSON
New Jersey
USA

Re: Bowl Turning 101 Question
Reply #7 - Jun 14th, 2019 at 8:45pm
 
Ed Weber wrote on Jun 14th, 2019 at 8:12pm:
Thanks for the input everyone.
I see many people true up the perimeter of the rough blank but never seem to explain or understand why, this made me curious.
Once I have a somewhere near round blank mounted, I don't usually bother with truing up the perimeter unless there is a vibration issue or I need a specific size for something.
I figure if it's not affecting anything, why true it up just to cut it away. Undecided
I typically just determine the size of the recess or tenon and then go directly to removing the waste, regardless if the blank is truly round or not. As I progress through the shaping, 90 percent of that area will be turned away.

Everyone does it differently


I am with you if its kind of balanced i go straight into shaping the outside and creating the recess.  I start with a 2 1/8 inch hole 1/4 inch deep for my chuck to shape the outside.
Back to top
  
WWW Black-Label-Woodworks-1706061859611577  
IP Logged
 
Grant Wilkinson
WR Addict
*****
Offline



Posts: 675

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Ottawa
Ontario
Canada

Re: Bowl Turning 101 Question
Reply #8 - Jun 15th, 2019 at 8:11am
 
I guess that I'm odd man out here. Even if the blank is "roundish", I start it between a steb centre in the headstock and live centre in the tailstock. I play around with that set up for balance and to see the grain pattern I like. I rough turn the outside to the shape of the piece. I don't bother to turn it true since, as Ed pointed out, it won't be a cylinder when it's done. If I see something in the grain that I like or don't like, I may move the centre to either include or exclude it. When I get the outside roughed out, I turn a tenon on the bottom. Then, I reverse it into a chuck, true up the outside a final time, and hollow it out.
I started on this method having watched many Lyle Jamieson videos. Before that, I tended to mount on a face plate. But, doing that committed me to the orientation of the blank. Using Lyle's method, I can change the orientation to make best use of the grain pattern and other things in the blank.
It's not a particularly fast process - at least for me - but I'm a hobbyist and not racing against the clock.
Back to top
  

Grant Wilkinson
Ottawa ON
 
IP Logged
 
robo_hippy
WR Addict
*****
Offline



Posts: 2,909

Eugene, OR, USA
Eugene, OR
USA

Re: Bowl Turning 101 Question
Reply #9 - Jun 15th, 2019 at 10:19am
 
For production work, if you want the grain to show for best effect, how you cut the blank out makes a huge difference. With years of experience, I have grain orientation set when I cut the slab so I don't have to move it around once it is on the lathe. Might make a good practice exercise. One reason I never liked commercial bowl blanks is they don't cut it out the way I would, they just cut slabs from logs. I cut a round off, then look at it to decide how I need to cut it up.

robo hippy
Back to top
  
WWW  
IP Logged
 
Ed Weber
WR Administrator
WR Patron
*****
Offline



Posts: 6,423

Wilton, California, USA
Wilton
California
USA

Gender: male

JET 1642
Grizzly G0584
Re: Bowl Turning 101 Question
Reply #10 - Jun 15th, 2019 at 11:07am
 
robo_hippy wrote on Jun 15th, 2019 at 10:19am:
One reason I never liked commercial bowl blanks is they don't cut it out the way I would, they just cut slabs from logs


Many, not all, commercial blanks are cut for yield.
This also goes for, spindles, veneers, moldings, trim, common lumber,.... well just about every wood product I can think of. This is why, when ever possible I cut my own stock.
When you can have control over the grain direction and orientation, (how and where it's used) it usually shows in the final product.

Once, several years ago, I was buying wood pieces from a vendor at the yearly show. I had been buying from this same vendor for several years and they knew me. One time he said to me, "you spend more time looking at each piece of wood than anybody". He was giving me a compliment, he knew i wasn't buying any old piece of wood just because it was on sale (show price).
Back to top
  
 
IP Logged
 
Mike Peace
Senior Member
****
Offline


WR Rocks!

Posts: 297

Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Atlanta
Georgia
USA

Gender: male

PM3520B
Re: Bowl Turning 101 Question
Reply #11 - Jun 28th, 2019 at 10:16am
 
This video shows my approach.
Multimedia File Viewing and Clickable Links are available for Registered Members only!!  You need to Login or Register
Back to top
  

Mike

"God is great and life is GOOD!"
WWW  
IP Logged
 
John Grace
WR Addict
*****
Offline


Everyone needs a good
wingman...

Posts: 810

Bel Air, Maryland, USA
Bel Air
Maryland
USA

Re: Bowl Turning 101 Question
Reply #12 - Jun 30th, 2019 at 9:07pm
 
1) examine the blank thoroughly, allowing the grain and any imperfections to contribute to final design.2) round the blank as much as possible with bandsaw. 3) mount face plate and hold in addition with tailstock. 4) determine max initial turning speed, starting there. 5) with freshly sharpened gouge I start with the prince's side. 6) I turn up the rams constantly and as frequently as the piece allows 7) true up bottom of piece 8) now totally true, I reshaping the gouge and complete the shaping with lighter and lighter grazing passes to final shape 9) reverse piece and turn bottom along with returning the outside. By now my rams are typically between 2 &2500 rams.  Make several final passes at very high shear angle to finish any remaining tool marks 10) reverse piece once more with vacuum chuck and complete bottom.
Back to top
  

“If history were taught in the form of stories, it would never be forgotten.”  Kipling
 
IP Logged
 
Ed Weber
WR Administrator
WR Patron
*****
Offline



Posts: 6,423

Wilton, California, USA
Wilton
California
USA

Gender: male

JET 1642
Grizzly G0584
Re: Bowl Turning 101 Question
Reply #13 - Jul 1st, 2019 at 9:06am
 
John Grace wrote on Jun 30th, 2019 at 9:07pm:
5) with freshly sharpened gouge I start with the prince's side.


Huh

John Grace wrote on Jun 30th, 2019 at 9:07pm:
9) reverse piece and turn bottom along with returning the outside.


This is a major difference to my method.
Once an area is complete, it's complete. I don't turn the outside again unless there was an area I couldn't access or a section I need to blend in some way. The foot area usually needs the removal of jaw marks and a bit of sanding.
I have often finished (put on a coat or two) the outside, before I mount for turning the inside.
Back to top
  
 
IP Logged
 
John Grace
WR Addict
*****
Offline


Everyone needs a good
wingman...

Posts: 810

Bel Air, Maryland, USA
Bel Air
Maryland
USA

Re: Bowl Turning 101 Question
Reply #14 - Jul 1st, 2019 at 2:56pm
 
Ed Weber wrote on Jul 1st, 2019 at 9:06am:
Once an area is complete, it's complete.


My problem with a piece being 'done' is my OCD kicks-in.  When I reverse the piece to turn off the bottom, the piece will frequently have just the slightest wobble.  Is that a problem?  Not really of course.  Problem is...I really have been clinically diagnosed as OCD and simply 'knowing' it's there will drive me crazy.  Also...and only because this is my way and I wouldn't advocate otherwise, I turn with as many RPMs as possible, frequently making my final grazing passes above the 3k range at a super-high shear angle.  I used to think other turners claims' of being able to start sanding at 150 or 220 simple bravado and while I won't claim I'm 'there', I will say my method has gotten me relatively close.  And as I've said to many others...what works safely for you is what's right for you.

BTW:  5) was supposed to read 'I start with the piece's side' in order to true up the blank thereby allowing me to get to higher speeds faster.  Hard to type correctly on the Kindle.
Back to top
  

“If history were taught in the form of stories, it would never be forgotten.”  Kipling
 
IP Logged
 
Pages: 1 2 
Send Topic Print