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Turning Elm... (Read 222 times)
 
John Grace
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Bel Air, Maryland, USA
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Turning Elm...
Sep 30th, 2019 at 2:13pm
 
My wood mill recently found me three 7'x16"x6" slabs of beautifully colored elm ($50 each).  I'm not sure what species of elm this is aside from the fact that the wood was harvested in MD.  Questions for the group include working characteristics, anything to be on the look-out for, and does the wood 'move' much when drying?  Thanks all...John
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“If history were taught in the form of stories, it would never be forgotten.”  Kipling
 
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Don Stephan
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Cincinnati, Ohio, Ohio, USA
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Re: Turning Elm...
Reply #1 - Sep 30th, 2019 at 6:51pm
 
Both red and American elm turn very well for me  Can't remember how much it moves during drying.

Larger pores line up in regular wavy lines in late season growth, and delicate lacy medullary ray pattern when perpendicular to growth rings.  Fascinating to look at the grain.
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Al Wasser
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Pueblo West, CO, Colorado, USA
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Re: Turning Elm...
Reply #2 - Oct 1st, 2019 at 9:07am
 
The Siberian elm we get in Colorado smells like dirty kitty litter.  No particular turning problems
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robo_hippy
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Eugene, OR, USA
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Re: Turning Elm...
Reply #3 - Oct 1st, 2019 at 11:40am
 
Most elm smells like cat urine. The smell gets better as it dries. Most of what we get here in western Oregon had huge growth rings from lots of rain and a long mild growing season. It has an inter locking grain which made it great for chair seats. What I have turned seemed to come off rather fuzzy.

robo hippy
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Arlin Eastman
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Council Bluffs, Iowa, USA
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Re: Turning Elm...
Reply #4 - Oct 1st, 2019 at 6:36pm
 
I have many elm along with thousands of Black Walnut and 25 species of other trees growing on the acreage and I love the red elm or any other elm for that matter.

It has really nice grain and some of it smells and some do not weather fresh or dried.  I can say almost all wood shifts or warps to some degree while turning that is the big reason I turn all the wood dry or almost dry.

Some people like the shapes while drying and others like me do not so try it both ways and see what you get and if you like it.
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John Grace
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Bel Air, Maryland, USA
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Re: Turning Elm...
Reply #5 - Oct 2nd, 2019 at 11:34am
 
Thank you everyone for your inputs...they're appreciated.
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Jurriaan Kalkman
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just below the middle, Netherlands
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Re: Turning Elm...
Reply #6 - Oct 4th, 2019 at 6:22am
 
I love turning elm - freshly cut it has a beautiful contrast between heartwood and sapwood.

It doen't move much, and it resists cracking very well, so vases with the pit in the center are quite possible.
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« Last Edit: Oct 4th, 2019 at 6:22am by Jurriaan Kalkman »  

Well, I'm a Dutchman!
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