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Light Box (Read 121 times)
 
Ed Weber
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Light Box
Jul 2nd, 2020 at 8:55am
 
Here is an article on making a light box for product photography.
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The better your pieces look, the more likely they are to be purchased.
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Ralph Fahringer
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Re: Light Box
Reply #1 - Jul 2nd, 2020 at 11:56am
 
Biggest problem is that the lighting is coming in from the sides only.

Also, the light isn't being diffused enough. You need a larger "box" and bigger light sources...as well as lighting coming in to light up the front of the piece.

The Marmite jar is the perfect example of not enough lighting on the front.

Make a frame at least 30 - 36" on a side and cover the sides and top with a thin white fabric or scrim or some sort of other diffusing material.

Those stupid little lights shown in that site are almost useless for good lighting.
Remember that the output of those lights are diminished as it goes thru a diffuser, thus the need for more wattage.

It is easier to stop down the aperture of the camera than try to open it for more light at the expense of depth of field.  In  that point.. for the best representation of your work, you need as much depth of field as possible, which makes more of the piece in focus.

The smaller the box, the more the background is noticeable in the photo... meaning that area where the backdrop goes from flat to up the back, which usually seems to split the piece in half visually.

The idea is to either make the piece the only thing you notice or make it so the piece is on something that ADDS to its appeal, like a log or a brick wall or some other thing.


I remember a while ago on eBay, there was a guy who sold minerals and crystals and he had his girlfriend hold them so all you saw was the rock in her hands and her boobs above it.
Definitely added to its appeal!! Smiley

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Ed Weber
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Re: Light Box
Reply #2 - Jul 2nd, 2020 at 1:11pm
 
Don't get mad at me, I didn't write it  Grin

You do need to either know a little about photography or be willing to experiment. These days it's no big deal to take a few hundred pics a day. If you were using film you'd go broke.

I posted this because I believe a good quality photo is the last step in the process. Your photo can either make a good piece look bad or a bad piece look better. It's your work after all, why not have a photo that represents it properly.
I agree with the jist of what you wrote Ralph. Get as much light as you can and get as much space as you can. The main problem is that most people don't have room for a dedicated photo shoot area. You can take good looking photos with a small, table top setup but it can be more difficult.
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Ralph Fahringer
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Re: Light Box
Reply #3 - Jul 2nd, 2020 at 1:39pm
 
Yeah, I'm sort of used to having the studio setup.

I had (still have) a pair of 900 watt studio light pillars and a 4x5 view camera where i shot artists flat work.
Still have the equipment but not the studio. It was like paying $600/month to store the equipment.
Been trying to sell those big ones for a while now.


Eventually, I'd like to empty an upstairs room and set up a small studio for just this.
I also have a pair of 2' square fluorescent lights and some scrim for diffusers.

When I get too old for framing, I can shoot turners work....with a camera OR a shotgun!! Their choice!! Smiley
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Ed Weber
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Re: Light Box
Reply #4 - Jul 2nd, 2020 at 3:21pm
 
One of the nice things about the lighting these days (LED) is that they don't heat up the room like the older ones used to.
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