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Sanding Interface Pads (Read 108 times)
 
Don Stephan
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Cincinnati, Ohio, Ohio, USA
Cincinnati, Ohio
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Sanding Interface Pads
Nov 10th, 2020 at 8:28pm
 
Like many here, I use mandrels, interface pads, and sanding discs from Vince.  And I always accepted without question his recommendation to use the firm yellow pad for grits to 120.  Last week though, while sanding along the outside of a bowl, I noticed that the sandpaper was only working on a very narrow strip of the wood - the firm pad was not flexing at all and the outside of the bowl curved away from the small point of contact.  And I was finding sanding scratches not removed as I progressed from 80 or 100 through 120

On the next few bowls I decided to try using the medium pad with grits to 120.  The contact area is larger, so the pressure is spread over a slightly larger area.  I am not seeing as many sanding scratches when I begin with 150.

I would still use the yellow "radius" interface pad on the inside curved sides of bowls (lower grits) and the yellow "tapered" interface pad on the inside flat middle of the bowl.

Has anyone else tried this approach?
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robo_hippy
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Eugene, OR, USA
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Re: Sanding Interface Pads
Reply #1 - Nov 13th, 2020 at 12:25pm
 
I use the firm pads, with the 1/4 round edge profile for grits up to 180 or even 220. Then I switch to the medium pads up to 400. If I go over 400, then I go to the soft pad.

When sanding the inside of a bowl, I am working more with the edge of the pad. That rounded edge fits into the concave surface better than the more flat part of the pad. If the curve is too tight for that edge to fit into the curve, then I angle the pad to more like a 45 degree angle. Not sure if you know the trick for cutting coves on a table saw, but if you angle the board, you can get a smaller arc. When sanding the outside of a bowl, I sand more with the center/flat part of the pad. I figure this gives me more of an even wear pattern on my discs.

As for sanding scratches, I spend far more time with grits up to 120, than I do with all of the following grits, up to 400. Most of the time, I can start with 100 or 120. Seldom under that. I could some times start higher, but I always seem to spend more time with the first grit, and I can save time by starting a little coarser. I can remove 80 grit scratches with 120, but prefer to use 100 first. I can not remove 80 grit scratches with 150. Other than that, it is being able to see the scratches before you step up. That involves lighting and good glasses.

robo hippy
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