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Blank mounting advice. (Read 102 times)
 
Gavin Botha
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Blank mounting advice.
Nov 24th, 2021 at 8:24pm
 
I have this jig for cutting stacking rings out of a single 3/4" board. Now 40 years ago when my dad used this I saw him glue the good board to a plywood faceplate with thick paper. After seperating the rings, there was a lot of cleanup to get rid of the paper remnants. Is there a newer simple plan? Some sort of adhesive that will let go?

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robo_hippy
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Re: Blank mounting advice.
Reply #1 - Nov 25th, 2021 at 12:28pm
 
The paper can be cleaned by sanding and/or using a card scraper. Not a big deal, generally. Some use the hot melt glue. I think the commercial grade glue guns work best. The hobby level ones are a bit sketchey because they don't quite get hot enough, so the bond isn't always as secure.

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Louie Powell
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Re: Blank mounting advice.
Reply #2 - Nov 25th, 2021 at 2:58pm
 
If I understand correctly, you want to cut rings from a single board that can subsequently be stacked to form a bowl (the 'bowl from a board' technique).  Normally, I think this is done with a bandsaw, but I don't see any reason why you could not do it with a plywood faceplate and holding a parting tool at an angle while cutting the rings..

You ideally want the axis of rotation of the board to be exactly perpendicular to the board.  That way, the rings will all be flat so that  the bowl shape builds uniformly as you later stack those rings.  That's easily done with a plywood faceplate and a paper joint. 

When rings are cut using, for example, a bandsaw, there is no paper/glue on the narrow side of the ring, so minimal sanding is required to stack and glue the rings starting at the bottom of the bowl.  But when using a plywood faceplate, the glue/paper will be on that narrow side and must be removed completely.

The first thought that comes to mind is to pass the rings through a thickness sander.  But if you don't have one - - -

So, thinking out of the box, suppose you stacked the rings from the top of the bowl down rather than the usual bottom-up approach.  If you could grip the largest ring (perhaps using Cole jaws in expansion mode), you could then spin the ring while using a scraper to remove the paper and cured glue on the narrow side of the ring to create a clean face to which you can then glue the next smaller ring - and then rinse and repeat.

Could this work using hot-melt glue?  Probably, but because the glue is more viscous, getting the board truly flat on the faceplate would be more difficult.  That said, once you have the board mounted, you could flatten it so that the larger diameter of the rings is perpendicular to the axis of rotation.  Then, as you build the glue-up from the top down, you could flatten the bottom of each ring before adding the next smaller ring.  Hot-melt glue would probably leave less residue on the rings, but there might still be some that could be turned away while flattening the narrow bottom of each ring.  That residue will leave a mess on your turning tools that will need to be cleaned off frequently.
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Ed Weber
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Re: Blank mounting advice.
Reply #3 - Nov 25th, 2021 at 3:08pm
 
Louie Powell wrote on Nov 25th, 2021 at 2:58pm:
If I understand correctly, you want to cut rings from a single board that can subsequently be stacked to form a bowl (the 'bowl from a board' technique).  Normally, I think this is done with a bandsaw,

This is exactly the method I use.
When I've done it, I leave the blank square and either screw or bolt through the four corners outside of the bowl perimeter. This provides mounting and drive. The way the angle is on the tool rest means you start at the center and each successive ring is caged by the next, there is no real need to use tape or glue.
Photo is of a bowl made using this method
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Gavin Botha
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Re: Blank mounting advice.
Reply #4 - Nov 25th, 2021 at 9:35pm
 
This jig work from the outside in. A turner in UK sent me this. Been searching for a few years now. Actually do have access to a drum thickness sander. The 3 lines on the RHS had me confused. Turns out they are for cutting offset rings from a second board if the rings dont stack properly.

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« Last Edit: Nov 25th, 2021 at 9:46pm by Gavin Botha »  
 
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Ed Weber
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Re: Blank mounting advice.
Reply #5 - Nov 25th, 2021 at 10:31pm
 
Gavin Botha wrote on Nov 25th, 2021 at 9:35pm:
This jig work from the outside in.


The jig is just parallel slots, the order does not matter.
I work from the inside out because the first section cut is then caged in the turning. Then the second cut is caged in the turning and so on. This way I don't need to tape, glue or stop between cuts to get the exact same number and size of ring as cutting from the outside in.
Once removed from the lathe, they can be stacked up in the exact same way. The order in which they we cut doesn't matter. I was only offering a much simpler way to do it.
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Chris Brock
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Re: Blank mounting advice.
Reply #6 - Yesterday at 8:31am
 
I saw a YouTube video of someone using the technique Ed described, although I think he did put a couple stripes of double sided tape under the workpiece to keep the rings from rattling around within the captured space when freed by the cut. I would think the tape thing was hit or miss as there was only a small amount holding the pieces, but I don't suppose there's any harm in it.
If I find the video I'll post a link.
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Glenn Roberts
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Re: Blank mounting advice.
Reply #7 - Yesterday at 8:42am
 
Ed, is your method hollowing first? I'm guessing it would be since the rings are all bolted together. How then do you do the outside? After reversing, is each ring shaped then removed? Then the remaining rings rebolted?
TIA.
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Ed Weber
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Re: Blank mounting advice.
Reply #8 - Yesterday at 10:34am
 
Thanks Chris
And Yes, you can use a strip of double stick tape but it's not essential.
When I did these, I would prep a board like you see in the photo and bolt the four corners to a turning blank attached to a faceplate.
I took a sharpie and drew a line from the center out, for help with later alignment. Then I started parting, first the base piece, which is the center. Then each successive ring, how ever many your bowl has. Then is just a matter of removing the rings from the lathe. In my case, it was just removing four screws or bolts in the corners. The rings are then free to be stacked and glued.

One of the benefits of this method is that, depending on your design, the rings can be thin and fragile. This takes away the need to pry off or clean glue from the fragile rings, potentially damaging them. This is important since the face and the back are the gluing surfaces, you want to keep them in pristine condition for glue up.

One the blank has been glued up, then you just turn a bowl
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