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II’m 47 and have lived in the central Ohio area my whole life. I currently live near a small town called Plain City just 20 miles west of Columbus, with my wife Kelli and two teenage daughters Lindi and Ashley.

As far as jobs, I have worked in the automotive industry for the last 30 years as a machinist, moldmaker and Manufacturing Engineer.

Sense I was a kid I have always had a strong interest in making things. I grew up next to cabinet shop, so I always had plenty of free wood to make things. I got a lot of ideas for projects from all of dad’s handyman books.  

I started woodturning about 20 years ago by turning small items like pens and key chains. The lathe I started out on was a small metal lathe that I had to rebuild from pieces a friend had given me. Several lathes later and I turned my first bowl from maple burl. Even with a screw hole in the bottom, it is still one of my favorites. After that first bowl I really didn’t do much turning due to the demands of family and work. In 2003 a friend wanted me to turn some end tables in the shape of chess pieces for his wife. Problem was I didn’t have a lathe large enough to turn them. Luckily I had a friend who had a lathe that could handle the job. After turning them with his help, I haven’t put down my tools sense!

Until then I was unaware of all the different forms of turning. I joined the local turning club and was amazed at all the different things that could be turned. With a Delta midi I wanted to turn larger items. So, I converted a large metal lathe I had for woodturning. I started picking up architectural work for extra income and soon found out it wasn’t quite adequate for the job, so I purchased the lathe I have today which is a 4224 Powermatic with an extension bed that can handle a 9 ft long piece. My shop is 24’ X 40’ and ½ is for metal machining and the other ½ for wood.  

To me woodturning is the most satisfying part of woodworking. I guess because I
feel I have more freedom and I’m not held to any blue print with tight tolerances. Plus, it has more advantages over flatwork. You can use green wood, it’s free, if  you screw up like me you can make a quick adjustment or burn it!

I sell a few pieces occasionally, but give most away to friends and family. Last year I had a piece chosen “April Showers” by the Ohio Designer Craftsmen for “Best of 2008” Of the more than 300 artists, 105 pieces were chosen by 82 artists. Until now I haven’t done any shows nor have I had any pieces in galleries. My hope and goal is to someday be able to do both.  

Like others I stumbled across WR in 2006. I am very thankful for the help and support this site has offered to me and find it a great recourse for learning the art of turning.


Thanks,
Mark Damron 

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April showers Mahogany 15X8

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April showers Closeup

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Ash Hollow Form

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Bowls

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Color Ply Vessel

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Curly maple & Ebony Vessel 

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Hollow Forms

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Kokopelli Vesse

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Maple Columns

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Octobers Eve Bonksia Pod
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Pine Vessel

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Purple hart and birch vessel

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Spheres

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Vessels

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